Something is' Fishy & # 39; on the Blockchain, but this technology can reduce seafood fraud?




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A fisherman releases Red King crabs caught in a snurrevod, a lower network, on a ship in the Dobroflot Fishing Company during coastal fishing for Alaska Pollock Peter the Great Bay, Primorye Territory, Russia, 29 May 2018 . (Photo: Yuri Smityuk / TASS via Getty Images).

Whitebait or halibut Now, you are sure the expensive Atlantic salmon " Wild-caught "did you have dinner last night was actually the gourmet fish you thought you were? Or was it just a salmon grown on the cheaper farm, or maybe not even salmon? Not the shipping news, but you get the

you can be 100% sure of the tasty white tuna sushi that your local sushi bar actually serves with tuna – and not from Escolar – also known as oil fish? [19659003] What is the big problem, you could ask, well, Escolar is quite known for its delicious meat a, cheap and fat. intense stomach problems in other words, bad uncontrollable diarrhea.

Now, how likely is a sushi restaurant to serve its hungry customers to fish with such serious side effects? Or, however common, fraud in general in the fishing industry? The whole scene will probably surprise the average person, if they have not already investigated some topic. So, let's move on to the heart of the matter.

From 2010 to 2012, Oceana one of the largest organizations focused on the study of the oceans founded by a group of major foundations and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, conducted a study to explore fraud in the fishing industry. According to the research about one third of fish products in the United States (United States) have been incorrectly labeled. Shocked?

In addition, one in three fish products bought by people do not actually contain what the label says. This is the industry average. However, there are many species of fish that have a much higher percentage of fraud.

Fraud and seafood & amp; Illegal fishing

So how big is the problem of fraud in shellfish and illegal fishing activities? Well, "IUU" is illegal, unregulated and undeclared, & nbsp; were estimated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) the US environmental intelligence agency, for the cost of the global fishing industry between $ 10 billion and $ 23 billion l # 39; year from suppressed prices and lost revenues.

But since this figure is quite large and a few years ago, the actual number could be much higher.

In addition to the enormous economic impact of IUU fishing, environmental management and threats to global fish populations and association need to take fisheries management schemes into account. So, this is a big problem.

Returning to our friend the fish oil, while some crazy fish fanatics might think that 33% chance of having some serious loss in the bathroom the next day is not such a high price to pay for a delicious sushi platter, they may want to reconsider. I'm sorry to be so graphic here.

According to the same Oceana study, the possibility of being served instead of their own white tuna is about 84%. Ouch!

And these samples did not come from some shady drug stores. The grocery stores were actually quite low on the fraud scale – at 18%. This compared to restaurants and sushi bars that had fraud rates of 38% and 75% respectively. It makes you think.

Whitefin tuna is not even an isolated case. When it came to red snapper, only seven samples of the 120 actually contained the red snapper. Unbelievable. Fish such as halibut, grouper, cod and Chilean sea bass are classified between 19% and 38% in the wrong labeling scale.

When it comes to the salmon you had last night … well, we have no better news. A subsequent study by Oceana found that nearly three quarters (69%) of the time when Atlantic salmon was sold under "game" was actually the much cheaper version of salmon. [19659003] In addition to selling cheaper fish packaged as something more expensive, some fishing activities are even transmitting endangered species as common consumer products.

For example, in 2009, a group of researchers found that a high-end restaurant in Santa Monica, California, served sushi made by the whale You're on the verge of extinction. This was smuggled from Tokyo and billed as "fat tuna". Take it for a moment, and think about it.

Some operations also replace "real seafood" with plants or even artificial seafood produced from chemicals.

There have been cases where jellyfish, which is a common element in Asian cuisine, has been replaced with bamboo shoots or mustard – plants that can cause allergic reactions to some people. The Chinese police have unpacked several jellyfish unions that fabricate jellyfish from extremely high aluminum chemicals, which can cause enormous harm to unsuspecting consumers.

The tuna is ready to be inspected before the first auction of the year at the Tsukiji market in Tokyo, Japan, on Friday 5 January 2018. The iconic Tokyo fish market of Tsukiji has held the 39; auction of the last year pre-dawn on that before closing for the transfer. The highest bidder paid 36.5 million yen (about $ 320,000) for a 405 kilogram bluefin tuna (about 892 pounds), according to local media reports. (Photographer: Akio Kon / Bloomberg).

Supply Chain & amp; Sustainable Fisheries

But it is not only within the supply chain where problems can arise. Fraudulent fishing often abuses its employees, who are already seriously underpaid and put in inhumane conditions for extremely long hours. Furthermore, it is not uncommon to see poaching and slaughtering of sharks, dolphins and whales.

So, what are you doing to stop this? Well, there are organizations and companies that resisted the cause and decided to eliminate fraud and crime from the fishing industry. Create transparency and trust across the field.

One company that set itself the goal was Sea To Table one of the largest and most reliable suppliers of sustainable seafood products in the United States. Their plan was simple. They would buy fish from the local fisherman and sell them directly to the final consumer. The result is not the long supply chain involved.

Over the years, Sea To Table was able to become the poster of sustainable fishing, gathering a loyal customer base and participating in almost all projects concerning sustainable development

Recent, however, things have taken an unexpected and horrible turn, since Sea To Table was accused by the Associated Press (AP) for having conducted the same fraud that they initially had decided to eliminate. Following a thorough investigation conducted by the AP Sea to Table was charged with false advertising and mistakenly labeling his fish (eg improper terms such as "local" and "captured" ).

became suspicious when Sea To Table sold Montauk tuna in the heart of winter, when the port of Montauk was frozen and no tuna boats went fishing. From this moment on, new tests continued to appear. DNA analysis indicated that the "local" tuna of the yellowfin tuna that the company was selling probably came from the other side of the world.

There were also reports of fishermen working abroad who were forced to work on fishing boats belonging to Mare Alla tavola .

"We were treated like slaves," said one of the fishermen. "They treated us like robots without any conscience." And, these fishermen often worked long hours unimaginable, sometimes shifting up to 22 hours, without food or water, while only $ 1.50 a day was paid.

It is difficult to see the model of behavior of sustainable fishing that falls on the same path as the fraudulent companies that wanted to eliminate. The unexpected news has left many customers Sea To Table some of whom are well-known and famous chefs, simply baffled. All this time, they believed they were supporting a fair cause, only to find that Sea To Table was no different.

Blockchain To The Rescue?

But is there still hope? Well, companies that are supporting this cause remain and are working hard to figure out how to clean up the fraudulent seafood industry.

One of the most promising solutions to do this comes in the form of blockchain technology. While many people understand blockchain only in the context of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum, there are many other cases of the use of this technology – Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) technology.

Two things that make blockchain unique are its immutability and transparency. Everything that is stored on the blockchain is there permanently. No one can edit or delete stored information and all users on the network have the opportunity to view this data.

Each phase of the supply chain is monitored by IoT (Internet-of-Things) sensors, which are connected to the fish as soon as it is caught by the fisherman.

Some companies are already using blockchain technology to trace the supply chain, for example with an initiative with Tuna on the Blockchain ] with a source system so that you know where it comes from the tuna. At the end of 2016 it was reported that an English start-up called & nbsp; Provenance & nbsp; went out to Indonesia and tested tuna on the blockchain .

More recently, IBM, aka "Big Blue", pioneered blockchain space initiatives with consortium initiatives around the global supply chain. Employing about 2,000 people in the blockchain space, one of IBM's recent projects saw the company form a joint venture in January with the Danish enterprise conglomerate A.P. Moller-Maersk .

Based in the New York metropolitan area, this new venture was seeking to provide more efficient and secure methods for global trade using blockchain technology. The goal was to develop a so-called "global trade digitalization" platform based on open standards and designed for use by the entire global shipping ecosystem.

This development followed a move by IBM last December to apply blockchain technology for food traceability to support consumers offline and online. Specifically, Big Blue, a Chinese retailer of Walmart and Nasdaq, JD.com joined forces with the Tsinghua University, National Laboratory Laboratory for E-Commerce Technologies, announcing a Blockchain Food Safety Alliance collaboration to improve monitoring and food safety in China. It represented an 'extension of the efforts of Walmart and IBM in the United States in August of 2017.

Sensors & amp; Fish

Some sensors also control the temperature, humidity and other factors of the product. So, when a consumer buys the fish himself from a supermarket, or when a restaurant receives a fish order, he can check the trip of that exact fish online using a tracking ID or QR code.

They can see each factory pass the fish, when the fish was transported and even the name of the fisherman's cat. OK, the last may not be true, but you get the point: everything can be controlled by the consumer. And since the information is on the blockchain, no one can change it later.

A Sushi restaurant in San Diego called Harney Sushi is already printing edible QR codes on their rice paper wafers. These QR codes direct people to the NOAA FishWatch website, where visitors can learn more about the sustainability and the origin of the fish they are eating.

Blockchain company like VeChain and project HyperLedger are developing new ways to improve each process in supply chain management with blockchain and different RFID (radio frequency identification) sensors, NFC (Near Field Contact) and QR codes. In particular, HyperLedger has a subdivision called Sawtooth, which focuses on developing solutions for sustainable fishing.

The protagonists of the sector claim that the blockchain could definitely improve the fishing industry as well as any other industry. It is claimed that opens up many new opportunities and ways to improve our existing processes – and remove piles of paperwork. Certainly it is a place in our technological future and as such the understanding of the blockchain will be important.

There are many sources that provide educational information on blockchain technology, for example Crypto and Blockchain Talk podcast which provides useful insights into the world of cryptocurrencies, blockchain and Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs). And, Cryptofinance24 intends to continue to publish useful information on the vast cryptoworld and related ecosphere.

Although & nbsp; I have & nbsp; I just tried to prove that the seafood industry is full of fraud and it is very likely that the fish you bought from the store or ordered from a restaurant is not the fish you thought you ordered, there are companies that are working to change this problem.

These companies are developing potentially revolutionary solutions that could bring transparency to the entire industry and many of them use blockchain technology. When you see a QR code on a can of tuna or a host of rice in the near future, know that it will probably tell you where the fish comes from and the places it has passed before it is within reach.

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A fisherman releases Red King crabs caught in a snurrevod, a bottom net, on a ship of the Dobroflot Fishing Company during coastal fishing for Alaska Pollock at Peter the Great Bay, Primorye Territory, Russia, 29 May 2018 . (Photo: Yuri Smityuk / TASS via Getty Images).

Whitebait or halibut Now, you are sure that the very expensive Atlantic salmon caught for dinner last night was actually gourmet fish. Or, it was just a salmon grown in cheaper agriculture – or maybe not even salmon? It's not shipping news, but you'll soon have the picture.

In addition, you can be 100% sure of the tasty white tuna sushi that your Local sushi bar actually serves made with tuna – and not with escolar – also known as fish oil?

What's the big deal, you might ask. Well, Escolar is rather known for its delicious, cheap and fatty meat. Meat that causes intense stomach problems in other words, bad uncontrollable diarrhea.

Now, how likely is a sushi restaurant to serve its hungry customers to fish with such serious side effects? Or, however common, fraud in general in the fishing industry? The whole scene will probably surprise the average person, if they have not already investigated some topic. So, let's move on to the heart of the matter.

From 2010 to 2012, Oceana, one of the largest organizations focused on the study of the oceans founded by a group of major foundations and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, conducted a study to explore fraud in the fish industry. According to research, one third of fish products in the United States (USA) have been incorrectly labeled. Shocked?

In addition, one in three fish products bought by people do not actually contain what the label says. This is the industry average. However, there are many species of fish that have a much higher percentage of frauds

Seafood fraud and illegal fishing

So, how big is the problem of fraud in seafood and of illegal fishing activities? Well, the "IUU" fishing activity, which is illegal, unregulated and undeclared, was estimated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the US Environmental Intelligence Agency, for the cost of the global fishing industry between $ 10 billion and $ 23 billion

But since this figure is quite large and a few years ago, the actual number could be much higher.

In addition to the enormous economic impact of IUU fishing, the environmental consequences and threats to global fish populations and by association fisheries management regimes need to be considered. So, this is a big problem.

Returning to our friend the fish oil, while some crazy fish fanatics might think that 33% chance of having some serious loss in the bathroom the next day is not such a high price to pay for a delicious sushi platter, they may want to reconsider. I'm sorry to be so graphic here.

According to the same Oceana study, the possibility of being served instead of their own white tuna is about 84%. Ouch!

And these samples did not come from some shady drug stores. The grocery stores were actually quite low on the fraud scale – at 18%. This compared to restaurants and sushi bars that had fraud rates of 38% and 75% respectively. It makes you think.

Whitefin tuna is not even an isolated case. When it came to red snapper, only seven samples of the 120 actually contained the red snapper. Unbelievable. Fish such as halibut, grouper, cod and Chilean sea bass are classified between 19% and 38% in the wrong labeling scale.

When it comes to the salmon you had last night … well, we have no better news. A subsequent study by Oceana found that nearly three quarters (69%) of the time when Atlantic salmon was sold to "game" was actually the most farmed salmon version in agriculture.

In addition to selling cheaper fish wrapped as something more expensive, some fishing activities are passing on endangered species as common consumer products.

For example, in 2009, a group of researchers found that a high-end restaurant in Santa Monica, California, served sushi prepared by the Six Endangered Whale. This was smuggled from Tokyo and billed as "fat tuna". Take it for a moment, and think about it.

Some operations also replace "real seafood" with plants or even artificial seafood produced from chemicals.

There have been cases where jellyfish, which is a common element in Asian cuisine, has been replaced with bamboo shoots or mustard – plants that can cause allergic reactions to some people. The Chinese police have unpacked several jellyfish unions that fabricate jellyfish from extremely high aluminum chemicals, which can cause significant harm to unsuspecting consumers.

Tuna are prepared for inspection before the first auction of the year at the Tsukiji market in Tokyo, Japan, Friday 5 January 2018. The iconic Tokyo fish market of Tsukiji has held the auction of the last year pre-dawn on that before closing for the transfer. The highest bidder paid 36.5 million yen (about $ 320,000) for a 405 kilogram bluefin tuna (about 892 pounds), according to local media reports. (Photographer: Akio Kon / Bloomberg).

Supply Chain & Sustainable Fishing

But it is not only within the supply chain where problems can arise. Fraudulent fishing often abuses its employees, who are already seriously underpaid and put in inhumane conditions for extremely long hours. Furthermore, it is not uncommon to see poaching and slaughtering of sharks, dolphins and whales.

So, what are you doing to stop this? Well, there are organizations and companies that resisted the cause and decided to eliminate fraud and crime from the fishing industry. Create transparency and trust across the field.

One company that set itself the goal was Sea To Table one of the largest and most reliable suppliers of sustainable fish products. Their plan was simple. They would buy fish from the local fisherman and sell them directly to the final consumer. The result is not the long supply chain involved.

Over the years, Sea To Table was able to become the poster of sustainable fishing, gathering a loyal customer base and participating in almost all projects concerning sustainable development

Recent, however, things have taken an unexpected and horrible turn, since Sea To Table was accused by the Associated Press (AP) for having conducted the same fraud that they initially had decided to eliminate. Following a recent in-depth investigation conducted by the AP, Sea to Table has been accused of false advertising and incorrectly labeling its fish (eg improper terms such as "local" and "wild").

People began to become suspicious when Sea To Table sold Montauk tuna in the heart of winter, when the port of Montauk was frozen and no tuna boats went fishing. From this moment on, new tests continued to appear. DNA analysis indicated that the "local" tuna of the yellowfin tuna that the company was selling probably came from the other side of the world.

There were also reports of fishermen working abroad who were forced to work on fishing boats belonging to Mare Alla tavola .

"We were treated like slaves," said one of the fishermen. "They treated us like robots without any conscience." And, these fishermen often worked long hours unimaginable, sometimes shifting up to 22 hours, without food or water, while only $ 1.50 a day was paid.

It is difficult to see the model of behavior of sustainable fishing that falls on the same path as the fraudulent companies that wanted to eliminate. The unexpected news has left many customers Sea To Table some of whom are well-known and famous chefs, simply baffled. All this time, they believed they were supporting a fair cause, only to find that Sea To Table was no different.

Blockchain To The Rescue?

But is there still hope? Well, companies that are supporting this cause remain and are working hard to figure out how to clean up the fraudulent seafood industry.

One of the most promising solutions to do this comes in the form of blockchain technology. While many people understand blockchain only in the context of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum, there are many other cases of the use of this technology – Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) technology.

Two things that make blockchain unique are its immutability and transparency. Everything that is stored on the blockchain is there permanently. No one can edit or delete stored information and all users on the network have the opportunity to view this data.

Each phase of the supply chain is monitored by IoT (Internet-of-Things) sensors, which are connected to the fish as soon as it is caught by the fisherman.

Some companies are already using blockchain technology to trace the supply chain, for example, with an initiative with Tuna on the Blockchain, with a proven system. so you'll know where the tuna comes from. At the end of 2016 it was reported that a British start-up called Provenance went to Indonesia and tested the tracking tuna on the blockchain.

More recently, IBM – aka "Big Blue" – pioneered initiatives in the space blockchain with consortium initiatives around the global supply chain. Employing about 2,000 people in the blockchain space, one of IBM's recent projects saw the company form a joint venture in January with the Danish conglomerate business AP Moller-Maersk.

Based in the New York metropolitan area, this new venture was seeking to provide more efficient and secure methods for global trade using blockchain technology. The goal was to develop a so-called "global trade digitalization" platform based on open standards and designed for use by the entire global shipping ecosystem.

This development followed a move by IBM last December to apply blockchain technology for food traceability to support consumers offline and online. In particular, JD.com, a Chinese retailer of Big Blue, Walmart and Nasdaq, has joined forces with the national engineering laboratory of Tsinghua University for e-commerce technologies, announcing a collaboration for the Blockchain Food Safety Alliance to improve monitoring and food security in China. It represented an extension of the efforts of Walmart and IBM in the United States in August of 2017.

Sensors & Fish

Some sensors also control temperature, humidity and other factors of the products. So, when a consumer buys the fish himself from a supermarket, or when a restaurant receives a fish order, he can check the trip of that exact fish online using a tracking ID or QR code.

They can see each factory pass the fish, when the fish was transported and even the name of the fisherman's cat. OK, the last may not be true, but you get the point: everything can be controlled by the consumer. And since the information is on the blockchain, no one can change it later.

A Sushi restaurant in San Diego called Harney Sushi is already printing edible QR codes on their rice paper wafers. These QR codes direct people to the FishWatch NOAA website, where visitors can learn more about the sustainability and the origin of the fish they are eating.

Blockchain companies such as VeChain and the HyperLedger project are developing new ways to improve each process in supply chain management with blockchain and various RFID (radio frequency identification), NFC (Near Field Contact) and QR codes. In particular, HyperLedger has a subdivision called Sawtooth, which focuses on developing solutions for sustainable fishing.

The protagonists of the sector claim that the blockchain could definitely improve the fishing industry as well as any other industry. It is claimed that opens up many new opportunities and ways to improve our existing processes – and remove piles of paperwork. Certainly it is a place in our technological future and as such the understanding of the blockchain will be important.

There are many sources that provide educational information on blockchain technology, for example the podcast Crypto and Blockchain Talk, which provides useful insights into the world of cryptocurrencies, blockchain and Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs). And, Cryptofinance24 intends to continue to publish useful information on the vast cryptoworld and related ecosphere.

Although I have just attempted to prove that the seafood industry is full of fraud and it is very likely that the fish purchased from the store or ordered from a restaurant is not the fish you thought you had ordered, there are companies that they are working to change this problem.

These companies are developing potentially revolutionary solutions that could bring transparency to the entire industry and many of them use blockchain technology. When you see a QR code on a can of tuna or a host of rice in the near future, know that it will probably tell you where the fish comes from and the places it has passed before it reaches your reach.


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