One of the first blockchain-focused VCs is aiming for a new $ 50 million fund

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  Jalak Jobanputra is founder and managing partner of the VC fund focused on blockchain Future Perfect Ventures.

Jalak Jobanputra is founder and managing partner of the VC fund focused on blockchain Future Perfect Ventures Credit: Jalak Jobanputra

Over the past four years, through the violent ups and downs of the cryptography market, some investors have not lost faith: one of these is the New York venture capital firm Future Perfect Ventures ( FPV) For its second fund, it has assured about $ 25 million to invest in startups focused on blockchain, the technology behind cryptocurrencies High-profile supporters such as Marc Andreessen, Chris Dixon and Chris Sacca have contributed to the fund, which aims to collect $ 50 million, according to a person familiar with the issue.

FPV founder and managing partner Jalak Jobanputra, 45, has investing in investment banking before starting to fund start-up technology startups at the end of the 1990s. Investments continued until 2013, when he attended his first Bitcoin conference, and saw Crypto's potential before most of the VCs.

He thinks his different background has helped. "As an immigrant, as a woman, as someone who had experience in technology, I felt that we would be well positioned," he says. "I had spent a lot of time in emerging markets and Silicon Valley, so I was able to connect cultures and look at the world from a macro perspective."

Next to capital investors such as Pantera Capital, Blockchain Capital and the Digital Currency Group, Jobanputra has launched one of the first VC funds focused on the blockchain. In the fall of 2014, it acquired holdings in payment platform based on BitPesa blockchain and Abra crypto trading app.

One of his first investment theses was to focus on startups of business infrastructures that would help the development of the nascent sector. He supported the London-based electronic portfolio company Blockchain, which now has more than 28 million accounts with cryptographic resources. He sank more than $ 500,000 in Blockstream, a company focused on making bitcoin transactions faster and cheaper.

In his second fund, Jobanputra has invested in several infrastructure startups. Strix Leviathan, based in Seattle, makes cryptographic software. Invisible Labs is creating a custody solution for cryptographic assets. Everledger traces the source of high value resources, such as diamonds. Unocoin based in India is a cryptographic trading platform. Harbor aims to take assets that are difficult to negotiate as real estate and private equity and turn them into tokenised securities.

He also played the corner of the infrastructure in his pre-blockchain days when he invested in companies such as the supply chain software company Viacore and the financial services software company Yodlee. IBM acquired Viacore in 2006, delivering a four or five-fold return for Jobanputra. Yodlee became public in 2014 and has returned more than ten times its investment.

In four years, Jobanputra states that the first fund of the FPV has increased in value by about two and a half times. These unrealized gains are placed in 10% of the highest VC funds launched in 2014, according to Pitchbook data . & nbsp;

One of the first cryptographic companies Jobanputra did not get is a Coinbase trading platform. In 2014, he was investing only if he could be the "first currency" in the "seed" phase. Two years earlier, Coinbase had already made its sowing tour with investors such as Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian and former partner Y Combinator Garry Tan.

Today, especially all the other criteria, look for entrepreneurs who are passionate about space. "From 2014 to 2017, it was a deep encrypted winter," he says, referring to a period when bitcoins exchanged well below the peak of 2013. "This required a lot of resilience and a real passion for what they were building. " Jobanputra says that 90% of the startups he financed continued to raise more money. "This shows that we have supported the entrepreneurs who were in this for the right reasons," he says. "They are generating revenue and break even when there is no readily available capital."

Jobanputra also cares about diversity. He is president of Collective Future a group of women who promote diversity and inclusion in the crypts and blockchains. "It is imperative that my portfolio companies take the D & amp problem seriously." He says. In her first fund, over 50% of the founders of her portfolio were women and 10% were underrepresented minorities. In his second fund, four of the nine founders he supports are women.

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  Jalak Jobanputra is founder and managing partner of the VC Future Perfect Ventures fund focused on blockchain.

Jalak Jobanputra is founder and managing partner of the VC Future Perfect Ventures fund focused on blockchain. Jalak Jobanputra

Over the past four years, through the violent ups and downs of the cryptographic market, some investors have not lost faith: one of these is New York's venture capital firm, Future Perfect Ventures (FPV). 25 million to invest in startups focused on blockchain, the technology behind cryptocurrencies High-profile supporters such as Marc Andreessen, Chris Dixon and Chris Sacca have contributed to the fund, which aims to raise $ 50 million, according to a person familiar with the question.

FPV founder and managing partner Jalak Jobanputra, 45, worked in investment banking before starting to finance the early stage technology startups at the end of the 1990s, continuing to invest until 2013, when he attended his first Bitcoin conference, and saw Crypto's potential before most of the VCs.

He thinks his different background has helped. "As an immigrant, as a woman, as someone who had experience in technology, I felt that we would be well positioned," he says. "I had spent a lot of time in emerging markets and Silicon Valley, so I was able to connect cultures and look at the world from a macro perspective."

Next to capital investors such as Pantera Capital, Blockchain Capital and the Digital Currency Group, Jobanputra has launched one of the first VC funds focused on the blockchain. In the fall of 2014, it acquired holdings in payment platform based on BitPesa blockchain and Abra crypto trading app.

One of his first investment theses was to focus on startups of business infrastructures that would help the development of the nascent sector. He supported the London-based electronic portfolio company Blockchain, which now has more than 28 million accounts with cryptographic resources. He sank more than $ 500,000 in Blockstream, a company focused on making bitcoin transactions faster and cheaper.

In his second fund, Jobanputra has invested in several infrastructure startups. Strix Leviathan, based in Seattle, makes cryptographic software. Invisible Labs is creating a custody solution for cryptographic assets. Everledger traces the source of high value resources, such as diamonds. Unocoin based in India is a cryptographic trading platform. Harbor aims to take assets that are difficult to negotiate such as real estate and private equity and turn them into tokenised securities.

He also played the corner of the infrastructure in his pre-blockchain days when he invested in companies such as the supply chain software company Viacore and the financial services software company Yodlee. IBM acquired Viacore in 2006, delivering a four or five-fold return for Jobanputra. Yodlee became public in 2014 and has returned more than ten times its investment.

In four years, Jobanputra states that the first fund of the FPV has increased in value by about two and a half times. These unrealized gains are placed in 10% of the VC funds launched in 2014, according to Pitchbook data.

One of the first cryptographic companies Jobanputra did not get is a Coinbase trading platform. In 2014, he was investing only if he could be the "first currency" in the "seed" phase. Two years earlier, Coinbase had already made its sowing tour with investors such as Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian and former partner Y Combinator Garry Tan.

Today, especially all the other criteria, look for entrepreneurs who are passionate about space. "From 2014 to 2017, it was a deep encrypted winter," he says, referring to a period when bitcoins exchanged well below the peak of 2013. "This required a lot of resilience and a real passion for what they were building. " Jobanputra says that 90% of the startups he financed continued to raise more money. "This shows that we have supported the entrepreneurs who were in this for the right reasons," he says. "They are generating revenue and break even when there is no readily available capital."

Jobanputra also cares about diversity. She is the president of the Collective Future, a group of women that promotes diversity and inclusion in the crypts and blockchains. "It is crucial that my portfolio companies take the D & I issue seriously," he says. In her first fund, over 50% of the founders of her portfolio were women and 10% were underrepresented minorities. In his second fund, four of the nine founders he supports are women.

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