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How Blockchain will come to the campus

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Senior Vice President, IBM Global Industries, Platforms and Blockchain Bridget van Kralingen speaks during the Digitalization and New Gilded Age forums at the Spring World Bank / IMF meetings on Wednesday, 18 April 2018, in Washington (AP Photo / Jose Luis Magana)

Blockchain, decentralized and secure information technology, is more often associated with cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, but almost since the beginning encouraging and entertaining [19659003] & nbsp; uses have been taken into consideration and developed.

But in education, the uses for blockchain have been slow to develop, even to conceptualize.This could be due to the fact that leaders and educational institutions have developed a reputation as slow adapters for technology, a reputation that is probably earned in some cases.It can also be because, although teaching can be [19] 659005] become less human learning is still completely. The education of the hat concerns the free sharing of information. For the most part, knowledge is not something we safeguard.

Nonetheless, blockchain is probably coming to campus. More precisely, it will arrive after the campus.

While the Declaration of Groningen sounds like something that economists launch at the Nobel Prize café, or perhaps the subsequent sequel to Bourne, it is actually an agreement to work towards creating credentials educational, easily accessible, highly transportable and safe.

The idea is based on four pillars.

The first is that access to transcripts, existing recordings of academic achievements, requires a lot of work and takes time. The second is that a transcript has limited information, usually only one course title and one vote. Third, with personal and population mobility, access to academic registers with common standards, at any time and anywhere, will be essential. And finally, it is assumed that, going forward, learning will not end when you graduate from high school or university, it will be a lifelong effort to improve work skills and stay updated with evolving technology.

For this ultimate purpose it is likely that education continues through institutions, geography and significant amounts of time. If, for example, you paid three years ago, you went to finish a computer code program at Dev Bootcamp, which was closed in 2017, showing that the realization of an employer or a future education provider could be a challenge.

So, the theory is that future training credentials will need to contain more information, be accessible by many people while still being safe and verifiable – things that look like a blockchain-type solution.

So far, nearly 100 schools and education organizations around the world, including about 40 in the United States, have signed on in Groningen. Among the American signatories are Duke, Johns Hopkins, Stanford and the University of Texas, Austin.

At the beginning of this year, the Groningen conference in Paris presented multiple presentations in particular on blockchain. A presentation was by "Blockchain in Education" – a group gathered at the University of Groningen to conduct a ongoing pilot with 20 international university students using blockchain to access and verify your credentials. MIT (MIT Media Lab) has already developed the mobile credential storage app called Blockcerts and used it in 2017 to issue secure digital certificates with blockchain to graduates of some of their programs. And a college, the University of Nicosia (UNIC) in Cyprus, is already offering blockchain credentials for all their programs.

But progress, while it is ongoing, is likely to remain slow and fragmented because the creation of a global academic based on blockchain and the system of educational credentials is not easy. Political considerations and concerns about the standardization of credentials are real. & Nbsp; There are also technical impediments.

In just one example, according to the recent analysis by Merija Jirgensons and Janis Kapenieks of the Riga Technical University in Latvia, several places do not agree with the particular type of blockchain technology to use. "Europeans, especially in the UK, have preferred Ethereum, while Americans have opted for bitcoin blockchain," the report said. "Most states in the EU are planning blockchain strategies to adapt to the national agenda and most use the Ethereum blockchain." The MIT Blockcerts application, for example, "… & nbsp; is not currently available for Ethereum", the technology most under government development in Europe

If global standardization is a goal, that level of discontent between cultures with similar educational facilities and standards is a really bad sign.

Add to those complications, the reality that the blockchain itself is not yet ready for the consumer in most cases. Consider this description of the MIT Blockcerts process from the Riga Technical University report,

"After the portfolio has been downloaded, the algorithms automatically generate the public / private key combinations that are a series of digital codes. private key is used to generate the cryptographic signature of the user (actually a digital ID) needed to verify each transaction.Now the Blockcerts portfolio is available on Apple iTunes and Google Play, but not on Blockcert itself released by the University: Subsequently, the student sends the public key to MIT who makes a digital recording and returns a hash string of numbers to the student as a verification of the authenticity of the diploma.The diploma itself is subsequently sent via e-mail as a file JSON (JavaScript Object Notation file) on which information on the student's public key is registered The private key in posses I know the student verifies the authenticity of the diploma. However, an employer or another university may try to further verify the authenticity of the diploma by checking the MIT verification portal … "

Frankly, this does not sound much better than simply using a "verification portal" to request a hard copy of your transcript or diploma.

However, the promise of blockchain in academic and educational credentials is real, has momentum and almost certainly will happen.The only open questions are when and how much will be universal .

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Senior Vice President, IBM Global Industries, Platforms and Blockchain Bridget van Kralingen speaks during the Digitization Forum and the New Golden Age at the World Bank / IMF Spring Meetings Wednesday, April 18, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo / Jose Luis Magana)

Blockchain, decentralized and secure information technology, is often associated with cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. But almost from the beginning the encouraging and entertaining uses have been examined and developed.

But in education, the uses for blockchain have been slow to develop, even to conceptualize. This could be due to the fact that leaders and educational institutions have developed a reputation as slow adapters to technology, a reputation that is probably earned in some cases. It can also be because, although teaching can be become less human the learning is still completely. the broader explanation could be that education is about free sharing of information. For the most part, knowledge is not something we safeguard.

Nonetheless, blockchain is probably coming to campus. More precisely, it will arrive after the campus.

While the Declaration of Groningen sounds like something that economists launch at the Nobel Prize café, or perhaps at the next sequel to Bourne, it is actually an agreement to work on creating easily accessible educational credentials, highly transportable and safe.

The idea is based on four pillars.

The first is that access to transcripts, existing recordings of academic achievements, requires a lot of work and takes time. The second is that a transcript has limited information, usually only one course title and one vote. Third, with personal and population mobility, access to academic registers with common standards, at any time and anywhere, will be essential. And finally, it is assumed that, going forward, learning will not end when you graduate from high school or university, it will be a lifelong effort to improve work skills and stay updated with evolving technology.

For this ultimate purpose it is likely that education continues through institutions, geography and significant amounts of time. If, for example, you paid three years ago, you went to finish a computer code program at Dev Bootcamp, which was closed in 2017, showing that the realization of an employer or a future education provider could be a challenge.

So, the theory is that future training credentials will need to contain more information, be accessible by many people while being safe and verifiable – things that look like a blockchain solution.

So far, almost 100 schools and education organizations around the world, including about 40 in the United States, have signed on in Groningen. Among the American signatories are Duke, Johns Hopkins, Stanford and the University of Texas, Austin.

At the start of this year, the Groningen conference in Paris presented more presentations on blockchain in particular. A presentation was "Blockchain in Education" – a group gathered at the University of Groningen to conduct an ongoing pilot with 20 international university students using blockchain to access and verify their credentials. MIT (MIT Media Lab) has already developed the mobile credential storage app called Blockcerts and used it in 2017 to issue secure digital certificates with blockchain to graduates of some of their programs. And a college, the University of Nicosia (UNIC) in Cyprus, is already offering blockchain credentials for all their programs.

But progress, while it is ongoing, is likely to remain slow and fragmented because the creation of a global academic based on blockchain and the system of educational credentials is not easy. Political considerations and concerns about the standardization of credentials are real. There are also technical impediments.

In one example, according to a recent analysis by Merija Jirgensons and Janis Kapenieks of Riga Technical University in Latvia, several places can not agree on the particular type of blockchain technology to use. "Europeans, especially in the UK, have preferred Ethereum, while Americans have opted for bitcoin blockchain," the report said. "Most EU states are planning blockchain strategies to adapt to national agendas and most use Ethereum's blockchain." The MIT Blockcerts application, for example, "… is not currently available for Ethereum", the technology most under the government's development in Europe [19659005] If global standardization is a goal, that level of discontent between cultures with similar educational facilities and standards, it's a really bad sign.

Add to these complications the reality that the blockchain itself is not yet ready for the consumer in most cases. Consider this description of the MIT Blockcerts process from the Riga Technical University report,

"After the portfolio has been downloaded, the algorithms automatically generate the public / private key combinations that are a series of digital codes. private key is used to generate the cryptographic signature of the user (actually a digital ID) needed to verify each transaction.Now the Blockcerts portfolio is available on Apple iTunes and Google Play, but not on Blockcert itself released by the University: Subsequently, the student sends the public key to MIT who makes a digital recording and returns a hash string of numbers to the student as a verification of the authenticity of the diploma.The diploma itself is subsequently sent via e-mail as a file JSON (JavaScript Object Notation file) on which information on the student's public key is registered The private key in posses I know the student verifies the authenticity of the diploma. However, an employer or another university may try to further verify the authenticity of the diploma by checking the MIT verification portal … "

Frankly, this does not sound much better than simply using a "verification portal" to request a hard copy of your transcript or diploma.

However, the promise of blockchain in academic and educational credentials is real, has momentum and almost certainly will happen.The only open questions are when and how much will be universal .

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