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How Blockchain is transforming health care

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Originally developed for cryptocurrency in 2008, blockchain allows a distributed network of computers to maintain a tamper-proof digital ledger.

However, technology is useful whenever collaborative parties have competing interests that require a third-party warranty. Large health organizations have been extraordinarily fast in adopting the blockchain.

In 2017, IBM reported that 16% of the 200 health managers examined by 16 countries anticipates the release of a commercial blockchain solution and 90% of the healthcare companies plan to launch a pilot blockchain project by 2018.

To date, blockchain in health care it was mainly used for audit trails and payments for value-based care. However, it has the potential to be used for a lot wider applications, especially given the rapid appearance of the & nbsp;internet of medical things (IoMT). Blockchain could soon allow smartwatches and smartphones to upload clinical information directly to the medical record.

Obstacles to the usability of EHR

In the past, software developers in health care were limited by complex and heterogeneous security requirements. Second Health Requirements in Canada, the industry standard for electronic medical records, CECs need to do three things: encrypt data transmitted by e-mail, keep personal health history and verify user identity.

Unfortunately, it is the doctors who bear the consequences of this security: the first EHR design. The existing EHR software is currently purchased and constructed based on legislative standards. And it is usually not tested on site in advance.

At least partly because of this, doctors report professionals burnout from poorly constructed interfaces. Many have even & nbsp;retired early to avoid the stress of working with EHR.

Not only is it possible for a secure distributed ledger to aid in medical billing via cryptocurrency, but it can be used to validate medical credentials, check access to patient records, protect the medical supply chain and verify clinical trials. .

For example, in 2016, the United States Department of Health and Human Services held a competition for innovative ideas related to blockchain technology. The winning white paper, written by MIT PharmOrchard project, spoke & nbsp; to use blockchain to feed clinical trials using genomic data.

Blockchain in clinical photography

As CEO of ShareSmart, a company focused specifically on clinical photography, I saw firsthand how blockchain offers two improvements to clinical photography software: smart contracts and better interface apps.

Smart contracts:& Nbsp;Smart contracts& nbsp; they are data sharing agreements between patients and care providers that are automatically applied. Blockchain can put the patient at the center of the health data ecosystem, allowing them to keep their records and check their access. This may include taking clinical pictures and flexible control over who accesses them and in which context (for example, diagnostics, research, before and after, academic, operational planning).

Interface app: In 2012, scientists data a Harvard recommended SMART platform& nbsp; – & nbsp; an "open, standards-based technology platform" that enables innovators to operate securely and without interruption in the entire healthcare system. While progress has been made in 2018, blockchain technology could quickly make this dream come true. Blockchain can transform the EHR market in the lead, creating security, flexibility and effectiveness associated business agreements. Doctors can take photos with their smartphones using secure clinical photography apps like ShareSmart or & nbsp; ProDerm and then, using an intelligent contract, upload images securely to an EHR with blockchain functionality.& Nbsp;

While these are two very specific examples, blockchain offers holistic solutions. Blockchain has the potential to be what a surgical team analyzing the technology of the College of Surgeons of the American defined "a point of convergence for health information." For example, Synx it is an automatic learning system that extracts retinal photos to automatically predict diabetic retinopathy in Mexico, where ophthalmologists are short of personnel compared to the population. Blockchain could allow consent, the acquisition and storage of these photo banks and then integrate the results of the algorithms with the EHR.

As the authors of the report explain, these interactions extend to many other areas of medicine with the potential to solve difficult problems such as:

  • interoperability: keep permanent health records from multiple sources.
  • Personalized medicine: allowing genomic risk calculators to access DNA sequences.
  • Search: reduction of silenced patient data sets and cross-manual updates.
  • Safety: reduce fraudulent billing, counterfeit medicines and the medical supply chain.

Like other forms of transactions, it is likely that we will see the health software of blockchain permeate in unexpected, subtle and, hopefully, beneficial ways. The United States Consumer Union estimates that 1 in 3 dollars of health care is a waste. Improving efficiency and safety could revolutionize clinical care and, with health budgets in the United States and Canada, could significantly change economies.

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Originally developed for cryptocurrency in 2008, blockchain enables a distributed network of computers to maintain a tamper-proof digital ledger.

However, technology is useful whenever collaborative parties have competing interests that require a third-party warranty. Large health organizations have been extraordinarily fast in adopting the blockchain.

In 2017, IBM reported that 16% of the 200 healthcare executives surveyed by 16 countries anticipated the release of a commercial blockchain solution and 90% of healthcare companies plan to launch a pilot blockchain project by 2018.

To date, blockchain health care has been mainly used for audit trails and payments for value-based care. However, it has the potential to be used for much wider applications, especially given the rapid spread of the Internet of medical things (IoMT). Blockchain could soon allow smartwatches and smartphones to upload clinical information directly to the medical record.

Obstacles to the usability of EHR

In the past, health software developers were limited by complex and heterogeneous security requirements. According to the Health Health Infoway requirements, the industry standard for electronic medical records, CECs need to do three things: encrypt data transmitted via e-mail, maintain personal health history and verify user identity.

Unfortunately, it is the doctors who bear the consequences of this security: the first EHR design. The existing EHR software is currently purchased and constructed based on legislative standards. And it is usually not tested on site in advance.

At least partly because of this, doctors report professional burnout from poorly constructed interfaces. Many even retired early to avoid the stress of working with EHR.

Not only is it possible for a secure distributed ledger to aid in medical billing via cryptocurrency, but it can be used to validate medical credentials, control access to patient records, protect the medical supply chain and verify clinical trials. .

For example, in 2016 the United States Department of Health and Human Services organized a competition for innovative ideas related to blockchain technology. The winning white paper, written by MIT's Project PharmOrchard, concerned the use of blockchain to feed clinical trials using genomic data.

Blockchain in clinical photography

As CEO of ShareSmart, a company focused specifically on clinical photography, I saw firsthand how blockchain offers two improvements to clinical photography software: smart contracts and better interface apps.

Smart contracts: Smart contracts are data sharing agreements between patients and care providers that are automatically applied. Blockchain can put the patient at the center of the health data ecosystem, allowing them to keep their records and check the suppliers' access to it. This may include taking clinical pictures and flexible control over who accesses them and in which context (for example, diagnostics, research, before and after, academic, operational planning).

Interface app: In 2012, Harvard researchers recommended the SMART platform, an "open, standards-based technology platform" that enables innovators to operate safely and seamlessly throughout the healthcare system. While progress has been made in 2018, blockchain technology could quickly make this dream come true. Blockchain is able to transform the CCE market in the lead by creating secure, flexible and feasible associated business agreements. Doctors can take photos with their smartphones using secure clinical photography apps like ShareSmart or ProDerm and then, using an intelligent contract, upload images securely to a blockchain-savvy EHR.

While these are two very specific examples, blockchain offers holistic solutions. Blockchain has the potential to be what a surgical team analyzing the technology in the College of Surgeons of America has called "a point of convergence for health information". For example, Synx is a machine learning system that extracts retinal photos to automatically predict diabetes retinopathy in Mexico, where ophthalmologists are short of staff compared to the population. Blockchain could allow consent, the acquisition and storage of these photo banks and then integrate the results of the algorithms with the EHR.

As the authors of the report explain, these interactions extend to many other areas of medicine with the potential to solve difficult problems such as:

  • interoperability: keep permanent health records from multiple sources.
  • Personalized medicine: allowing genomic risk calculators to access DNA sequences.
  • Search: reduction of silenced patient data sets and cross-manual updates.
  • Safety: reduce fraudulent billing, counterfeit medicines and the medical supply chain.

Like other forms of transactions, it is likely that we will see the health software of blockchain permeate in unexpected, subtle and, hopefully, beneficial ways. The US Consumer Union estimates that 1 in 3 dollars for health care is a waste. Improving efficiency and safety could revolutionize clinical care and, with health budgets in the United States and Canada, could significantly change economies.

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