Home / Blockchain / Citizens Reserve's SUKU platform aims to provide blockchain-as-a-service for everyone – FreightWaves

Citizens Reserve's SUKU platform aims to provide blockchain-as-a-service for everyone – FreightWaves

The team of blockchain and technology veterans, including the former Deloitte Global Blockchain Lead, creates a "supply chain-as-a-service" ecosystem with a unique global platform for business partners [19659002] Citizens Reserve, the technology startup led by several entrepreneurs and former blockchain executives of Deloitte have unveiled SUKU an agnostic supply chain solution to address the problems of transparency, efficiency and product visibility in systems legacy. A blockchain-based platform, SUKU expects to open new markets, improve operations and reduce supply chain management costs. The SUKU ecosystem intends to offer key benefits to business partners such as access to transparent real-time data around the precise location of goods, the confidentiality of partners, an offer and order market, verification of activities and the automation of contractual agreements.

"It's for many different participants in the supply chain, it's on request, it's hard to design an ecosystem, and it's something you can use for a month or a week or even a single transaction," said Eric Piscini, CEO of Citizens Reserve, by phone at FreightWaves.

Participating in the supply chain is "the number one challenge by far", says Piscini. "We have created the platform to encourage players from across the industry."

"We designed it to be completely open." You have technology providers who want to get into the platform like the IoT companies and say, "Of course, come on board." From inboarding to ordering Use of services We have a truly unique approach, "he adds.

With today's businesses that often work with a myriad of partners on a global scale, the challenges presented by supply chain management are ever greater. Whether identifying a Chinese supplier or finding a carrier to transport products from Los Angeles to Toronto, these challenges are magnified by the lack of a global government agency or set of standards to ensure end-to-end visibility.

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