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Form 10-K Holly Brothers Pictures, for: Mar 31


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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C., 20549

FORM 10-K

[X] ANNUAL REPORT WITHIN THE MEANING OF SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE ACT OF CHANGE OF TITLES OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018

Number of Commission files: 000-55018

Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

(Exact name of the registrant as specified in his card)

Nevada

46-2111820

(State or other jurisdiction of

Constitution or organization)

(Employer I.R.S.

Identification number)

462 Stevens Ave, # 310

Solana Beach, CA 92075

(858) 987-4910

(Address, including postal code and telephone number,

Including the international prefix, of the registrant's main executive offices)

Securities registered in accordance with Section 12 (b) of the Law: None

Securities registered in accordance with Section 12 (g) of the Law: Ordinary Shares, nominal value $ 0.001 per share

Indicate if the registrant is a known expert issuer, as defined in the Securities Act 405. YES [  ] NO [X]

Indicate with a check mark if the registrant is not required to submit reports pursuant to article 13 or section 15 (d) of the law. YUP [  ] NO [X]

Indicate if the registrant (1) has filed all the notifications required to be filed by Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 in the previous 12 months (or shorter periods as required to file declarer such reports) and (2) has been subject to these archiving requirements for the last 90 days. YUP [  ] NO [X]

Indicate if the registrant has submitted electronically each interactive data file to be submitted and published in accordance with rule 405 of the ST Regulation during the previous 12 months (or for that shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and publish these files). YUP [  ] NO [X]

Indicate if the disclosure of unauthorized archives pursuant to Article 405 of the SK Regulation is not contained in this document and will not be contained, to the best registrant's knowledge, in the definitive declaration of proxy or information incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10 -K or any modification to this Form 10-K. [  ]

Indicate if the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or a growing emerging company. See the definitions of "accelerated large file", "accelerated filer", "smaller reporting company" and "emerging growth company" in the 12b-2 Exchange Rule.

Great accelerated filer [  ]

Accelerated filer [  ]

Filer not accelerated [X]

Small reporting company [X]

Emerging growth company [X]


If a growing emerging company indicates with a tick if the registrant has chosen not to use the extended transition period to comply with the new or revised accounting standards provided under Section 13 (a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

Indicate if the declarant is a company of convenience (as defined in rule 12b-2 of the law). YUP [  ] NO [X]

The aggregate market value of the registrant's share capital held by the registrant's non-affiliates, calculated by reference to the price at which the ordinary shares had been sold on the last business day of the second most recently completed fiscal quarter, was approximately $ 130,000. In determining the market value of shares with voting rights held by non-affiliates, the securities of the declarant owned by directors, officers and 10% or more shareholders of the declarant were excluded. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a definitive determination for other purposes. The number of outstanding ordinary shares of the declarant in circulation at 30 November 2018 was 1,244,000.

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SUMMARY

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PRELIMINARY NOTE ON ADVANCED DECLARATION

The Securities and Exchange Commission, referred to herein as SEC, encourages companies to disclose forward-looking information so that investors can better understand a company's future prospects and make informed investment decisions. Some statements that we may make from time to time, including without limitation, the statements contained in this report constitute "forward-looking statements" under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.

We make forward-looking statements under "Risk Factors", "Business", "Discussion and Analysis of the Management of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations" and in other sections of this report. In some cases, you can identify these statements with forward-looking words such as "could", "could", "should", "would", "could", "expect", "plan", "anticipate", "understand", "" Believing "," estimating "," anticipating "," potential "or" continuing "and the negative of these terms and other comparable terminology.These forward-looking statements, which are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions about us, may include projections of our future financial performance based on our growth strategies and anticipated trends in our business.These statements are only predictions based on our current expectations and projections of future events.There are important factors that could cause our actual results , level of activity, performance or results differ materially from the results, level of activity, performance or results expressed or implied by the declarations -thinking. In particular, it is necessary to consider the numerous risks and uncertainties described in "Risk factors".

Although we believe we have identified material risks, these risks and uncertainties are not exhaustive. Other sections of this report describe additional factors that could negatively impact our economic and financial performance. Furthermore, we operate in a highly regulated, competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks and uncertainties emerge from time to time, and it is not possible to predict all risks and uncertainties, nor can we evaluate the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, it can cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in all forward-looking statements.

Although we believe that expectations reflected in forward-looking statements are reasonable, we can not guarantee future results, level of activity, performance or results. Furthermore, neither we nor others take responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of any of these forward-looking statements. We must not rely on forward-looking statements as forecasts of future events. We have no obligation to update any of these forward-looking statements after the date of this report to adapt our previous statements to actual results or revised expectations, and we do not intend to do so.

PART I

References in this Annual Report on Form 10-K to the "Company", "we", "our" and "we" are used here to refer to Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

ARTICLE 1. BUSINESS

Overview

Starting from February 2018, through our subsidiary Power Blockchain LLC ("Power Blockchain"), we started to operate a start-up specialized in blockchain mining for the Bitcoin network, the high consumption process required to verify and record the digital exchange of money for cryptocurrency transactions. In exchange for processing these complex mathematical equations, we will be rewarded with the digital currency. We still have to start significant operations and will require new capital investments to be implemented on our business strategy.

Our business plan involves the creation of a cryptocurrency mining operation, which manages specialized computers (also known as "cryptocurrency miners") that generate cryptocurrency (mainly Bitcoin). A bitcoin is an asset that can be transferred between parties via the Internet, but without the use of a central administrator or a clearing agency. The decentralized term is often used in bitcoin descriptions, referring to the lack of of Bitcoin's need for management by a central party.

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As further indicated below (see "Our Operations"), the results of our initial crypto-currency mining operations have so far been inconclusive, so we are currently evaluating our strategic alternatives in the future.

Our industry

Bitcoin mining uses a combination of hardware and software to achieve a dual purpose: (i) verify the authenticity and validity of bitcoin transactions (ie bitcoin movement between addresses) and (ii) the creation of new bitcoins. Bitcoin miners do not need permission to participate in transaction verification. Rather, the miners compete to solve a prescribed and complicated mathematical calculation using computers dedicated to the activity. The rounds of the competition are repeated approximately every ten minutes. In each particular round of the competition, the first miner to find the solution to the mathematical calculation is the miner who gets the privilege of announcing the next block to add to the blockchain.

A new block that is added to the blockchain is used to take all recent transactions that have not yet been confirmed and verify that no one is fraudulent. Recent transactions, even if not confirmed, generally contain transaction fees that are assigned to the miner who produces the block in which transactions are entered, and then confirmed. The successful miner also gains the so-called block reward, a newly created bitcoin. Thus, bitcoin miners are financially incentivized to conduct their work. The financial incentives received by bitcoin miners are a vital part of the process through which the Bitcoin network operates.

After successfully winning a round of the competition (winning a round we talk about mining a new block), the miner then transmits a copy of the newly formed block to the peers on the Bitcoin network, which then update the respective copies of the blockchain adding the new block, thus recognizing the confirmation of previously existing transactions in an unconfirmed state. A bitcoin recipient must wait until a new block is created to see the conversion of the transaction from an unconfirmed state to a confirmed state.

The Bitcoin mining process is the innovation that allows it to function without a central referee. The transactions are initially in an unconfirmed state because they must be checked for any attempt at a so-called double expense. There would be a double expense if Part A were to send the same bitcoin to both Part B and Part C. No payment system can be valid if it allows for double spending. In a payment system with a central administrator (for example, payments sent through a bank), the task of avoiding double expenses lies with the central administrator. The Bitcoin mining process is the mechanism by which it prohibits double expenses and remains without a central administrator.

Part A could attempt a double expense – sending the same bitcoins to both B and C – creating two digitally signed transactions. The first transaction will propose to transfer the bitcoin from Part A to Part B and the second to Part C. Part A will then transmit both transactions to the Bitcoin network, and all participating computers would generally see both transactions within seconds. Initially, the transactions would be in an unconfirmed state and no Bitcoin participant would be able to know which of the two transactions to verify and which to reject. However, participants would know that only one of the transactions may exist and that all participants must somehow agree which transaction to authorize and which to reject.

When a miner successfully extracts a new block, he eliminates the attempted double spend by choosing only one of the unconfirmed transactions and discarding the other. Thus, the miner acts as the arbiter in the resolution of any attempt at double expenses. The choice of the miner for which transaction to include in the block can be arbitrary. The only requirement, for the soundness of the system, is that only one of the two transactions is included. When the miner transmits the newly created block to the participants in the Bitcoin network, each participant will know which of the two transactions is valid and which one is not valid. If the miner attempts to include both transactions in the block, the Bitcoin network participants would immediately know that the block is invalid and discard it. From a systemic perspective, the most important function of the miner is to be an arbiter in the case of any double expense attempt, thus maintaining the solidity of the Bitcoin network.

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In addition to being the arbiter in case of attempted double spending, the miners also serve to generate newly created bitcoins. The probability of a miner to successfully generate a new block is proportional to the amount of computing power used by the miner in proportion to the total amount of computing power dedicated to the mining sector. Although the overall amount of computing power dedicated to bitcoin mining tends to increase over time, the amount of bitcoin generated each day is not. By design, bitcoin provision is limited and the rate at which bitcoin is generated is fixed and set to decrease by half every four years based on a defined schedule.

If a single miner adds computing power to his mining operation, it will increase his probability of generating new blocks and at the same time reduce the likelihood that other miners will generate new blocks, but the total amount of new blocks generated will not increase. With intent, bitcoin mining is set to be a competition between miners where miners are incentivized to add computing power over time, in order to protect themselves from the consequences of increased computing power by others. miners. Since the number of blocks generated is fixed, a miner can only gain a temporary advantage by adding calculation power and the advantage dissipates while other miners add computational power to their respective mining operations.

The race between miners to add processing power is a Bitcoin feature that keeps the Bitcoin network secure. The Bitcoin base protocol works safely until no miner gets control of over 50 percent of the mining processing power. If a miner gets control of more than 50% of the mining processing power, the network will still operate safely, provided the miner has no nefarious targets. The addition of mining processing power makes it increasingly difficult for a nefarious miner to gain control of over 50% of the mining processing power.

Our operations

On February 14, 2018 we were granted permission by the Kingdom of Lesotho to conduct cryptocurrency mining operations in Lesotho. As part of this permission, we were allowed to operate from the Lesotho power company and we negotiated an electricity tariff agreement. At the date of this report, we had 70 cryptocurrency miners and Power Control Units (PCUs), 50 of which were installed in Lesotho, 10 of which are in customs in South Africa, and 10 of which are on deposit in South Africa. We have started mining operations in Lesotho but have not registered any revenue to date.

We operate from a rented facility that can host mining operations. We have secured this space of modest size according to need, without a long-term lease. We have completed a "space infrastructure" built to support our mining operations, such as electrical connections, sound insulation, air conditioning, dehumidification and IT networking and we have hired a supervisor for the supervision of the site.

Because of the various economic and market conditions, which have been largely excluded from our ability to effectively control, the results of our cryptocurrency mining operations have so far been inconclusive. Therefore, we are evaluating our strategic alternatives in the future.

Company history

We were established on February 22, 2013 as PowerMedChairs, a Nevada company. From our incorporation until February 2018, our operational plan was to rebuild mainly in poor state electric / electric wheelchairs. On June 2, 2017, we changed our name to Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. As discussed earlier, in February 2018, we ceased this activity and started our blockchain mining business through our acquisition of Power Blockchain described below.

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On February 1, 2018, we entered into an exchange agreement whereby we acquired 100% of the Power Blockchain holdings from the owners of Power Blockchain in exchange for the issuance of convertible bonds in a total amount of 2.2 million of dollars. The notes: (i) mature five years from the date of issue: (ii) accrue interest at 5% per annum; (iii) request reimbursement in four equal installments on the dates of the second, third, fourth and fifth anniversary following the issue; and (iv) are convertible at the discretion of the holder in our ordinary shares at a conversion price of $ 0.13 per share. At the end of the exchange contract, Power Blockchain became our wholly owned subsidiary. The Power Blockchain had outstanding debt obligations for a total amount of $ 570,000, accrued interest at rates of between 12-13% per annum, which bonds had expired and delayed. In March 2018, Power Blockchain debt holders filed a lawsuit against us in the Superior Court of San Diego, in relation to outstanding and delayed debt obligations. On March 22, 2018, we agreed to enter into a conditional agreement with the debt holders. The settlement agreement requires the periodic issuance to the holders of the debt, subject to certain properties and time limits, of a total of up to 3,078,000 and 3,157,000 shares respectively, exempted from registration pursuant to Section 3 (a) (10) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the California Code Code Code 25017 (f) (3), as amended, after an audition evaluating the relative merits of the proposed agreement, which was held and approved on 2 April 2018.

competition

In the extraction of cryptocurrencies, companies, individuals and groups generate cryptocurrency units through mining. Miners can range from individual enthusiasts to professional mining operations with dedicated data centers. Miners can organize themselves in the mineral pools. A pool of mining activities is created when cryptocurrency miners pool their processing power on a network and mine transactions together. The prizes are then distributed proportionally to each miner based on the work power conferred. Mining pools became popular when extraction difficulties increased. Mining pools allow miners to group their resources so that they can quickly generate blocks and receive rewards (eg fractions or cryptocurrency units) on a consistent basis instead of just mining, where premiums may not be received for long periods. We are in competition or we could in the future compete with other companies that concentrate all or part of their activities on the possession or operation of cryptocurrency exchanges, the development of blockchain programs and mining activities. At present, information about the activities of these companies is not readily available as the vast majority of participants in this sector do not publish information publicly or information may not be reliable.

Government regulation

The government regulation of blockchain and cryptocurrency is currently largely non-existent and is actively taken into account by the US federal government through a number of agencies (SEC, CFTC, Federal Trade Commission and the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network of the US Treasury Department. United) and other countries. State government regulations can also be applied to certain activities such as cryptocurrency exchanges (bitlicense, banking and money transmission regulations) and other activities in which we participate or participate in the future. Other regulatory bodies are governmental or semi-governmental and have shown interest in regulating or investigating companies engaged in the business blockchain or cryptocurrency.

The blockchain and cryptocurrency regulations are in a nascent state with agencies that investigate activities and their practices, gather information and generally try to understand the risks and uncertainties in order to protect investors in these companies and in cryptocurrencies in general. The regulations will certainly increase, in many cases, even if at the moment it is not possible to know how they will increase, how the regulations will apply to our companies or when they will be effective. Various bills have also been proposed in the Congress for the adoption of our activity that can be adopted and have an impact on us. With the evolution of the regulatory and legal environment, we may be subject to new laws, further regulations by the SEC and other agencies, including our mining activities and other activities.

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Intellectual property

We actively use specific hardware and software for our cryptocurrency mining operations. In some cases, the source code and other software resources may be subject to an open source license, as the ongoing technological development in this area is open source. For these works, we intend to adhere to the terms of any license agreements that may be in effect. At the moment we do not own and do not have any plans to search for patents in relation to our existing and planned blockchain and cryptocurrency operations. We expect to rely on trade secrets, trademarks, service marks, trade names, author rights and other intellectual property rights and we expect to license the use of owned and controlled intellectual property rights. from others.

The employees

As of March 31, 2018, we had no permanent employees and two part-time contractors / consultants.

Lawsuits

We are not subject to any dispute.

ARTICLE 1A. RISK FACTORS

The following risks and uncertainties should be carefully considered. If any of the following circumstances occur, our company, financial conditions or operating results could be severely damaged. An investment in our securities is speculative in nature, involves a high degree of risk and should not be carried out by an investor who can not bear the economic risk of his investment for an indefinite period and who can not afford the loss of the entire investment.

Risks related to our activity

We have a history of operational losses and may not be able to reach or sustain profitability; we have recently moved to a completely new company and may not be successful in this new business.

We are not profitable and have suffered losses since our inception. We expect to continue to suffer losses in the near future and these losses may increase as we continue to work to develop our business. Previously, we were committed to pursuing the business of rebuilding wheelchairs in ruins and sales of wheelchairs and we were not successful in this business. In January 2018, we decided instead to pursue a blockchain and a digital currencyrelated activities. Our initial efforts in this new activity will mainly focus on bitcoin extraction. Currently, our only operations are in our bitcoin mining facility in Lesotho and mine is still at a relatively early stage of development. Our current strategy is new and unproven, it is in a sector that is itself new and evolving and is subject to the risks discussed below. This strategy, like the previous ones, could not be successful and we could never become profitable. Even if we achieve profitability in the future, we may not be able to sustain profitability in subsequent periods.

As we try to expand our operations, our costs will grow rapidly, which could seriously damage our business or increase our losses.

Our extraction operations are expensive and we expect our expenses, including acquisitions, to grow in the future. This expenditure growth will continue if we are able to acquire additional cryptocurrency miners, which will require more computing infrastructure, and hiring additional employees to support future growth potential. Our costs will be based on the growth of operations and may not be offset by a corresponding increase in our revenue. Our expenses may be higher than we anticipate and our investments to make our business more efficient may not be successful and may exceed monetization efforts. Increasing our costs without a corresponding increase in our revenues would increase our losses and could seriously damage our assets and our financial performance.

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We may not be able to raise additional capital necessary to grow our business.

We will probably continue to operate at a loss, at least until our business is established, and expect to raise additional capital to expand our operations and pursue our growth strategies, including potential acquisitions of complementary businesses, and to respond to competitive pressures or unexpected requirements for working capital. We may not be able to obtain additional debt or equity financing on favorable terms, if at all, which could jeopardize our growth and adversely affect our existing operations. If we raise additional equity financing, our shareholders may suffer a significant dilution of their ownership interests and the value per share of our common stock may decline. Furthermore, if we commit to further debt financing, debt holders would have priority over ordinary share holders and we may be required to accept terms that limit our ability to incur additional debt and take other actions that would otherwise be in the interests of our shareholders, forcing us to maintain the specified liquidity or other relationships. We may not be able to compete with other companies, some of which have more resources and experience.

We may not be able to compete successfully against present or future competitors.

At the moment we do not have the resources to compete with the largest providers of similar services. The cryptocurrency industry has attracted different levelsprofile and consolidated operators, most of whom have liquid assets and financial resources substantially superior to us. With the limited resources we have available, we may encounter great difficulties in expanding our operations. Competition from existing and future competitors may result in our inability to expand our business. This competition from other entities with more resources and experience may result in the inability to maintain or expand our business, as we will never be able to properly execute our business plan.

Our rental property in Lesotho which houses our equipment and is our only facility can suffer damage, including damages that are not covered by insurance.

Our current and unique operational structure is in Lesotho and is subject to a variety of risks including:

·

the presence of construction or repair faults or other structural or construction damage;

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any non-compliance or liability under the regulations, requirements or requirements relating to the environment, health or safety or building permit requirements;

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any damage deriving from natural disasters; is

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complaints from employees and others for injuries sustained in our properties.

For example, a mine could be rendered inoperative, temporarily or permanently, following a fire or other natural disaster or terrorist or other attack on the mine. Safety and other measures we take to protect ourselves against these risks may not be sufficient. Inoltre, le nostre miniere potrebbero essere sostanzialmente danneggiate da un'interruzione dell'alimentazione o dalla perdita di accesso alla rete elettrica o dalla perdita della rete di fonti economicamente vantaggiose di capacità di generazione di energia elettrica. Dato il fabbisogno di energia, non sarebbe possibile far funzionare i minatori sui generatori di energia di riserva in caso di interruzione di corrente. La nostra assicurazione non copre alcuna interruzione delle nostre attività minerarie e potrebbe non essere adeguata a coprire le perdite subite a seguito di uno qualsiasi di questi eventi. Nel caso di una perdita non assicurata, inclusa una perdita in eccesso rispetto ai limiti assicurati, in nessuna delle miniere della nostra rete, tali mine potrebbero non essere riparate adeguatamente in modo tempestivo o del tutto e potremmo perdere parte o tutta la futura entrate che si prevede deriveranno da tali miniere. Il potenziale impatto sul nostro business è attualmente amplificato perché stiamo operando solo una miniera.

Poiché la nostra unica struttura è in Lesotho, siamo soggetti ai rischi associati alle operazioni internazionali.

Come società che opera in un paese straniero, siamo soggetti a una serie di rischi particolari, tra cui:

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esposizione alle condizioni economiche locali;

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potenziali cambiamenti negativi nelle relazioni diplomatiche di paesi stranieri con gli Stati Uniti;

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ostilità delle popolazioni locali;

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restrizioni e imposte sul ritiro di investimenti e redditi esteri;

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imposizione di politiche e regolamenti governativi contro l'uso commerciale e energetico da parte degli stranieri;

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restrizioni o requisiti di investimento stranieri;

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limitazioni alla nostra capacità di far valere legalmente i nostri diritti contrattuali in paesi stranieri;

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mancanza di protezione dei diritti di proprietà intellettuale;

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regolamenti che vietano o limitano l'estrazione di criptovalute;

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conflitti tra leggi locali e leggi statunitensi;

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esposizione alle fluttuazioni valutarie;

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ritenute alla fonte e altre imposte su rimesse e altri pagamenti da parte della nostra filiale locale; is

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cambiamenti e applicazione delle strutture fiscali straniere.

Qualsiasi operazione commerciale internazionale sarà soggetta a varie leggi e regolamenti anti-corruzione, incluse le restrizioni imposte dalla Foreign Corrupt Practices Act ("FCPA"). L'FCPA e simili antile leggi sulla corruzione in altre giurisdizioni vietano in genere alle società e ai loro intermediari di effettuare pagamenti impropri a funzionari governativi allo scopo di ottenere o generare affari. Non possiamo garantire che i nostri controlli e procedure interni ci proteggeranno dagli atti imprudenti o criminali che potrebbero essere commessi dai nostri dipendenti o da terze parti con cui lavoriamo. Se siamo ritenuti responsabili di violazioni della FCPA o di simili leggi anti-corruzione nelle giurisdizioni internazionali, potrebbero essere imposti sanzioni penali o civili.

Le modifiche o le azioni regolatorie possono alterare la natura di un investimento in noi o limitare l'uso di criptovalute in un modo che influenza negativamente la nostra attività, le prospettive o le operazioni.

Poiché le criptovalute sono cresciute sia in termini di popolarità che di dimensioni del mercato, i governi di tutto il mondo hanno reagito in modo diverso alle criptovalute, con alcuni governi che li hanno ritenuti illegali e altri che ne hanno consentito l'uso e il commercio ma, in alcune giurisdizioni, come negli Stati Uniti, soggetti ad ampie e, in alcuni casi, sovrapposizione, requisiti normativi e requisiti non chiari ed in evoluzione. Ongoing and future regulatory actions may impact our ability to continue to operate, and such actions could affect our ability to continue as a going concern or to pursue our new strategy at all, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects or operations.

Our change in our business strategy and name could subject us to increased SEC scrutiny.

We previously were engaged in the business of re-building wheelchairs in disrepair and the sales of wheelchairs. In February 2018, we determined to instead pursue a crypto-currency mining business, through our acquisition of Power Blockchain, LLC. The SEC has announced that it is scrutinizing public companies that change their name or business model in a bid to capitalize upon the hype surrounding blockchain technology, and has suspended trading of certain of such companies.  SEC Chairman Jay Clayton warned that it is not acceptable for companies without a meaningful track record in the sector to participate in blockchain technology, change their name and immediately offer investors securities without providing adequate disclosures about the risks involved.  As a result, we could be subject to substantial SEC scrutiny that could require devotion of significant management and other resources and potentially have an adverse impact on the trading of our stock.

We may face risks of Internet disruptions, which could have an adverse effect on the price of cryptocurrencies.

A disruption of the Internet may affect the use of cryptocurrencies and subsequently the value of our securities.  Generally, cryptocurrencies are dependent upon the Internet. A significant disruption in Internet connectivity could disrupt a currency's network operations until the disruption is resolved and have an adverse effect on the price of cryptocurrencies.

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Cryptocurrency has a short history and acceptance and/or widespread use of cryptocurrency is uncertain.

Currently, there is a relatively limited use of any cryptocurrency in the retail and commercial marketplace, thus contributing to price volatility that could adversely affect an investment in our securities. Banks and other established financial institutions may refuse to process funds for cryptocurrency transactions, process wire transfers to or from cryptocurrency exchanges, cryptocurrency-related companies or service providers, or maintain accounts for persons or entities transacting in cryptocurrency.  Conversely, a significant portion of cryptocurrency demand is generated by investors seeking a long-term store of value or speculators seeking to profit from the short- or long-term holding of the asset. The relative lack of acceptance of cryptocurrencies in the retail and commercial marketplace, or a reduction of such use, limits the ability of end users to use them to pay for goods and services. Such lack of acceptance or decline in acceptances could have a material adverse effect on our ability to continue as a going concern or to pursue our new strategy at all, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects or operations and potentially the value of bitcoin or any other cryptocurrencies we mine or otherwise acquire or hold for our own account.

Transactional fees may decrease demand for bitcoin and prevent expansion.

As the number of bitcoin awarded for solving a block in a blockchain decreases, the incentive for miners to continue to contribute to the bitcoin network will transition from a set reward to transaction fees. The requirement from miners of higher transaction fees in exchange for recording transactions in a blockchain may decrease demand for bitcoin and prevent the expansion of the bitcoin network to retail merchants and commercial businesses, resulting in a reduction in the price of bitcoin that could adversely impact an investment in our securities. In order to incentivize miners to continue to contribute to the bitcoin network, the bitcoin network may either formally or informally transition from a set reward to transaction fees earned upon solving a block. This transition could be accomplished by miners independently electing to record in the blocks they solve only those transactions that include payment of a transaction fee. If transaction fees paid for bitcoin transactions become too high, the marketplace may be reluctant to accept bitcoin as a means of payment and existing users may be motivated to switch from bitcoin to another cryptocurrency or to fiat currency.  Decreased use and demand for bitcoin may adversely affect its value and result in a reduction in the price of bitcoin and the value of our securities.

Political or economic crises may motivate large-scale sales of bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, which could result in a reduction in value and adversely affect us.

As an alternative to fiat currencies that are backed by central governments, digital assets such as bitcoin are relatively new, are subject to supply and demand forces based upon the desirability of an alternative, decentralized means of buying and selling goods and services, and it is unclear how such supply and demand will be impacted by geopolitical events. Nevertheless, political or economic crises may motivate large-scale acquisitions or sales of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies either globally or locally. Large-scale sales of bitcoin and ether or other cryptocurrencies would result in a reduction in their value and could adversely affect us. Such circumstances could have a material adverse effect on our ability to continue as a going concern or to pursue our new strategy at all, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects or operations and potentially the value of any bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies we mine or otherwise acquire or hold for our own account, and harm investors.

Our operations, investment strategies and profitability may be adversely affected by competition from other methods of investing in cryptocurrencies.

We compete with other users and/or companies that are mining cryptocurrencies and other potential financial vehicles, including securities backed by or linked to cryptocurrencies through entities similar to us. Market and financial conditions, and other conditions beyond our control, may make it more attractive to invest in other financial vehicles, or to invest in cryptocurrencies directly, which could limit the market for our shares and reduce their liquidity. The emergence of other financial vehicles and exchangetraded funds have been scrutinized by regulators and such scrutiny and negative impressions or conclusions could be applicable to us and impact our ability to successfully pursue our new strategy or operate at all, or to establish or maintain a public market for our securities. Such circumstances could have a material adverse effect on our ability to continue as a going concern or to pursue our new strategy at all, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects or operations and potentially the value of any bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies we mine or otherwise acquire or hold for our own account, and harm investors.

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Our future success will depend in large part upon the value of bitcoin, and the value of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies may be subject to pricing risk and has historically been subject to wide swings.

Our operating results will depend in large part upon the value of bitcoin. Specifically, our revenues from our bitcoin mining operations will be based upon two factors: (1) the number of bitcoins we mine and (2) the value of bitcoin.  In addition, our operating results will be directly impacted by changes in the value of bitcoin, because under the value measurement model, both realized and unrealized changes will be reflected in our statement of operations (i.e., we will be marking bitcoin to fair value each quarter).  This means that our operating results will be subject to swings based upon increases or decreases in the value of bitcoin.

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency market prices, which have historically been volatile and are impacted by a variety of factors, are determined primarily using data from various exchanges, over-the-counter markets and derivative platforms.  Furthermore, such prices may be subject to factors such as those that impact commodities, more so than business activities, which could be subjected to additional influence from fraudulent or illegitimate actors, real or perceived scarcity, and political, economic, regulatory or other conditions.  Pricing may be the result of, and may continue to result in, speculation regarding future appreciation in the value of cryptocurrencies, or our share price, inflating and making their market prices more volatile or creating "bubble"type risks.

Cryptocurrency inventory, including that maintained by or for us, may be exposed to cybersecurity threats and hacks.

As with any computer code generally, flaws in cryptocurrency codes may be exposed by malicious actors. Despite our efforts and processes to prevent breaches, our devices, as well as our servers, computer systems and those of third parties that we use in our operations, are vulnerable to cyber security risks, including cyber-attacks such as viruses and worms, phishing attacks, denial-of-service attacks, physical or electronic break-ins, employee theft or misuse, and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our servers and computer systems or those of third parties that we use in our operations. Such events could have a material adverse effect on our ability to continue as a going concern or to pursue our new strategy at all, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects or operations and potentially the value of any bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies we mine or otherwise acquire or hold for our own account.

We are subject to risks associated with our need for significant electrical power.  Government regulators may potentially restrict the ability of electricity suppliers to provide electricity to mining operations, such as ours.

The operation of a bitcoin or other cryptocurrency mine can require massive amounts of electrical power.  Further, our mining operations can only be successful and ultimately profitable if the costs, including electrical power costs, associated with mining a bitcoin are lower than the price of a bitcoin.  As a result, any mine we establish can only be successful if we can obtain sufficient electrical power for that mine on a cost-effective basis, and our establishment of new mines requires us to find locations at which that is the case.  There may be significant competition for suitable mine locations, and government regulators may potentially restrict the ability of electricity suppliers to provide electricity to mining operations in times of electricity shortage, or may otherwise potentially restrict or prohibit the provision or electricity to mining operations. Additionally, our mines could be materially adversely affected by a power outage.  Given the power requirement, it would not be feasible to run miners on back-up power generators in the event of a government restriction on electricity or a power outage.

Risks Relating to Our Common Stock

Your ownership may be diluted if additional capital stock is issued to raise capital, to finance acquisitions or in connection with strategic transactions.

We will need to raise additional funds to expand our operations or finance acquisitions by issuing equity or convertible debt securities, which would reduce the percentage ownership of our existing stockholders. Our board of directors has the authority, without action or vote of the stockholders, to issue all or any part of our authorized but unissued shares of common. Our articles of incorporation authorizes us to issue up to 200,000,000 shares of common stock. Future issuances of common stock would reduce your influence over matters on which stockholders vote and would be dilutive to earnings per share.

9


Shares issuable upon the conversion of convertible notes may substantially increase the number of shares available for sale in the public market and depress the price of our common stock.

In connection with our acquisition of Power Blockchain, we issued convertible notes in aggregate principal amount of $2.2 million. The notes: (i) mature five years from the date of issuance: (ii) accrue interest at 5% per annum; (iii) require repayment in four equal installments on the second, third, fourth and fifth anniversary dates after issuance; and (iv) are convertible at the option of the holder into our common stock at a conversion price of $0.13 per share.

Power Blockchain had outstanding debt obligations in aggregate principal amounts of $570,000, accruing interest at rates between 12-13% per annum, which obligations were overdue and in default. In March 2018, the Power Blockchain debt holders commenced a lawsuit against us in San Diego Superior Court, in connection with outstanding and overdue debt obligations. On March 22, 2018, we agreed to enter into a conditional settlement with the debt holders. The settlement agreement calls for the periodic issuance to the debt holders, subject to certain ownership and temporal limitations, of an aggregate of up to 3,078,000 and 3,157,000 shares respectively, exempted from registration pursuant to Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the California Corporations Code Section 25017(f)(3), as amended, after a fairness hearing evaluating the relative merits of the proposed agreement, which was held and approved on April 2, 2018.

To the extent any of these foregoing notes are converted into common stock and as and when the shares issuable pursuant to the foregoing lawsuit settlement are issued, there will be dilution to stockholders.

The concentration of our common stock ownership by our current management will limit your ability to influence corporate matters.

Our directors and executive officers beneficially own and are able to vote in the aggregate 83.1% of our outstanding common stock. As such, our directors and executive officers, as stockholders, will continue to have the ability to exert significant influence over all corporate activities, including the election or removal of directors and the outcome of tender offers, mergers, proxy contests or other purchases of common stock that could give our stockholders the opportunity to realize a premium over the then-prevailing market price for their shares of common stock. This concentrated control will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and, as a result, we may take actions that our stockholders do not view as beneficial. In addition, such concentrated control could discourage others from initiating changes of control. In such cases, the perception of our prospects in the market may be adversely affected and the market price of our common stock may decline.

We have no intention of declaring dividends in the foreseeable future.

The decision to pay cash dividends on our common stock rests with our board of directors and will depend on our earnings, unencumbered cash, capital requirements and financial condition. We do not anticipate declaring any dividends in the foreseeable future, as we intend to use any excess cash to fund our operations. Investors in our common stock should not expect to receive dividend income on their investment, and investors will be dependent on the appreciation of our common stock to earn a return on their investment.

Failure to maintain effective internal control over our financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could cause our financial reports to be inaccurate.

We are required pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or Section 404, to maintain internal control over financial reporting and to assess and report on the effectiveness of those controls. This assessment includes disclosure of any material weaknesses identified by our management in our internal control over financial reporting. Our management concluded that our internal controls over financial reporting were, and continue to be ineffective, and as of the year ended March 31, 2018. While management is working to remediate the material weakness, there is no assurance that such changes, when economically feasible and sustainable, will remediate the identified material weaknesses or that the controls will prevent or detect future material weaknesses. If we are not able to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, our financial statements, including related disclosures, may be inaccurate, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

10


ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

Our corporate and executive offices are in located in an office space in San Diego, California, provided by an attorney for the Company at no cost or commitment to the Company.

We operate from a rented facility in Lesotho capable of hosting mining operations.  We secured this modest size space on an as needed basis without a long term lease agreement.

We believe our facilities will be sufficient to meet our current needs and that suitable space will be available as and when needed. We do not own any real property.

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

From time to time in the ordinary course of our business, we may be involved in legal proceedings, the outcomes of which may not be determinable. The results of litigation are inherently unpredictable. Any claims against us, whether meritorious or not, could be time consuming, result in costly litigation, require significant amounts of management time and result in diversion of significant resources. We are not able to estimate an aggregate amount or range of reasonably possible losses for those legal matters for which losses are not probable and estimable, primarily for the following reasons: (i) many of the relevant legal proceedings are in preliminary stages, and until such proceedings develop further, there is often uncertainty regarding the relevant facts and circumstances at issue and potential liability; and (ii) many of these proceedings involve matters of which the outcomes are inherently difficult to predict. We have insurance policies covering potential losses where such coverage is cost effective.

We are not at this time involved in any legal proceedings.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

Not applicable.

11


PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

Our common stock is quoted on the OTC bulletin board.  During fiscal years ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 our stock was quoted under the symbol “HLLY” until February 28, 2018 when our symbol was changed to “MINR”. The last trade of our common stock occurred on August 13, 2018 and was $0.40 per share.

There have been only very few trades of our common stock since it was cleared for quotation, and there are no assurances an active market will ever develop for the stock.

Holders

As of November 30, 2018, there were approximately 35 holders of record of our common stock. In addition, we believe that additional beneficial owners of our common stock hold their shares in nominee or in “street name” accounts through brokers.

Dividends

We have never paid any dividends on our common stock. The payment of dividends in the future will be contingent upon our revenues and earnings, if any, capital requirements and general financial condition. It is the present intention of our Board of Directors to retain all earnings, if any, for use in our business operations and, accordingly, our Board of Directors does not anticipate declaring any dividends in the foreseeable future.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

The following table sets forth information regarding our equity compensation plans at March 31, 2018:

Plan category

Number of

securities to

be issued

upon exercise of

awesome

options,

warrants

and rights

(a)

Weighted-

average

exercise

price of

awesome

options,

warrants

and rights

(b)

Number of

securities (by

class) remaining

available

for future

issuance under

equity compensation

plans (excluding

securities reflected

in column (a))

(c)

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders (1)

1,000,000

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

Total

1,000,000

(1)

Represents shares of common stock that may be issuable under our 2018 Stock Plan, which has been approved by our stockholders. As of March 31, 2018, no securities had been issued pursuant to the 2018 Stock Plan.

12


Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

On February 1, 2018, we entered into an exchange agreement pursuant to which we acquired 100% of the equity interests in Power Blockchain from the owners of Power Blockchain in exchange for the issuance for convertible notes in aggregate principal amount of $2.2 million. The notes: (i) mature five years from the date of issuance: (ii) accrue interest at 5% per annum; (iii) require repayment in four equal installments on the second, third, fourth and fifth anniversary dates after issuance; and (iv) are convertible at the option of the holder into our common stock at a conversion price of $0.13 per share. Upon consummation of the exchange agreement, Power Blockchain became our wholly owned subsidiary.  The convertible notes were sold without registration under the Securities Act in reliance on the exemptions provided by Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act as transactions not involving a public offering to accredited investors, and in reliance on similar exemptions under applicable state laws.

Power Blockchain had outstanding debt obligations in aggregate principal amounts of $570,000, accruing interest at rates between 12-13% per annum, which obligations were overdue and in default. In March 2018, the Power Blockchain debt holders commenced a lawsuit against us in San Diego Superior Court, in connection with outstanding and overdue debt obligations. On March 22, 2018, we agreed to enter into a conditional settlement with the debt holders. The settlement agreement calls for the periodic issuance to the debt holders, subject to certain ownership and temporal limitations, of an aggregate of up to 3,078,000 and 3,157,000 shares respectively, exempted from registration pursuant to Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the California Corporations Code Section 25017(f)(3), as amended, after a fairness hearing evaluating the relative merits of the proposed agreement, which was held and approved on April 2, 2018.

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

On January 25, 2018, we completed a share purchase agreement with Anton Yeranossian, Irina Seppanen and A&A Medical Supply, LLC pursuant to which the Company agreed to purchase from such shareholders an aggregate of 2,661,172 shares of Company common stock for an aggregate purchase price of $340,000.

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto included in this Form 10-K. The forward-looking statements included in this discussion and elsewhere in this Form 10-K involve risks and uncertainties, including those set forth under “Cautionary Statement About Forward-Looking Statements.” Actual results and experience could differ materially from the anticipated results and other expectations expressed in our forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors, including but not limited to those discussed in this Item and in Item 1A – “Risk Factors.”

Overview

Commencing in February 2018, through our subsidiary, Power Blockchain LLC (“Power Blockchain”), we began operating a start-up venture that specializes in blockchain mining for the Bitcoin network, the computer intensive process required to verify and record the digital exchange of money for crypto-currency transactions. In exchange for processing these complex mathematical equations, we will be rewarded with digital currency. We have yet to commence meaningful operations, and will require new capital investment to execute upon our business strategy.

13


Our business plan is to build a cryptocurrency mining operation, operating specialized computers (also known as “crypto-currency miners") that generate cryptocurrency (primarily Bitcoin).  A bitcoin is an asset that can be transferred among parties via the Internet, but without the use of a central administrator or clearing agency. The term decentralized is often used in descriptions of bitcoin, in reference to bitcoin’s lack of necessity for administration by a central party.

On February 14, 2018, we were granted permission from the Kingdom of Lesotho to conduct crypto-currency mining operations in Lesotho. As part of this permission, we were permitted to operate by the Lesotho Electricity Company and we negotiated an electric rate agreement.  As of the date of this report, we owned 70 crypto-currency miners and Power Control Units (PCU), 50 of which have been installed in Lesotho, 10 of which are in customs in South Africa, and 10 of which are in storage in South Africa. We commenced mining operations in Lesotho but have not recorded any revenues to date.

We operate from a rented facility capable of hosting mining operations.  We secured this modest size space on an as needed basis without a long term lease agreement. We have completed a space infrastructure build out to support our mining operations, such as electricity connections, sound proofing, air conditioning, de-humidification, and IT networking and engaged a manager for site supervision.

We were incorporated on February 22, 2013 as PowerMedChairs, a Nevada corporation. Since our incorporation until February 2018, our plan of operation was to re-build primarily electric/power wheelchairs in disrepair. On June 2, 2017, we changed our name to Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. As discussed above, in February 2018, we ceased this business and commenced our blockchain mining business through our acquisition of Power Blockchain described below.

On February 1, 2018, we entered into an exchange agreement pursuant to which we acquired 100% of the equity interests in Power Blockchain from the owners of Power Blockchain in exchange for the issuance for convertible notes in aggregate principal amount of $2.2 million. The notes: (i) mature five years from the date of issuance: (ii) accrue interest at 5% per annum; (iii) require repayment in four equal installments on the second, third, fourth and fifth anniversary dates after issuance; and (iv) are convertible at the option of the holder into our common stock at a conversion price of $0.13 per share. Upon consummation of the exchange agreement, Power Blockchain became our wholly owned subsidiary. Power Blockchain had outstanding debt obligations in aggregate principal amounts of $570,000, accruing interest at rates between 12-13% per annum, which obligations were overdue and in default. In March 2018, the Power Blockchain debt holders commenced a lawsuit against us in San Diego Superior Court, in connection with outstanding and overdue debt obligations. On March 22, 2018, we agreed to enter into a conditional settlement with the debt holders. The settlement agreement calls for the periodic issuance to the debt holders, subject to certain ownership and temporal limitations, of an aggregate of up to 3,078,000 and 3,157,000 shares respectively, exempted from registration pursuant to Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the California Corporations Code Section 25017(f)(3), as amended, after a fairness hearing evaluating the relative merits of the proposed agreement, which was held and approved on April 2, 2018.

Results of Operations

The following discussion pertains to the Company’s operating and other expenses for the years ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, as reported in our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in Item 8.

General and administrative expenses for the year ended March 31, 2018 were $135,682 compared to $21,616 for the year ended March 31, 2017. This increase was due to incremental overhead costs that were incurred in the Company’s transition to the bitcoin mining business, including non-cash stock compensation expense of $7,167 (see Note 5).

Depreciation expense for the year ended March 31, 2018 was $16,393 compared to zero for the year ended March 31, 2017. Depreciation for the year ended March 31, 2018 represents the initial period amount of such expense applicable to the Company’s computers and equipment deployed on the bitcoin mining operations in Lesotho.

14


Impairment of Goodwill for the year ended March 31, 2018 was $2,200,000 compared to zero for the year ended March 31, 2017. As of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018, we determined that it would be appropriate to recognize an impairment adjustment in the full amount of $2,200,000 on the Goodwill that was originally established upon the Company’s acquisition of Power Blockchain in February 2018 in the amount of $2,200,000, due to unforeseen economic and market conditions that arose soon after the acquisition (see Note 4).

Impairments of property and equipment and of other intangible assets for the year ended March 31, 2018 were $170,186 and $2,044, respectively, compared to zero for both such impairment amounts in the year ended March 31, 2017.  Most significantly, we recognized the impairment adjustment in the amount of $170,186 to reduce the carrying value of the property and equipment deployed in the bitcoin mining operations to zero as of March 31, 2018 (see Note 4).

Interest expense for the year ended March 31, 2018 was $28,609 compared to zero for the year ended March 31, 2017. Interest for the year ended March 31, 2018 reflects the initial period amount of such expense applicable to the Company’s long-term debt obligations incurred in the acquisition of Power Blockchain in February 2018 (see Note 6).

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Operating activities. Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended March 31, 2018 was $129,854 compared to $21,843 for the year ended March 31, 2017. This increase was due to incremental overhead costs that were incurred in the Company’s transition to the bitcoin mining business.

Investing activities. Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended March 31, 2018 was $38,620 compared to zero for the year ended March 31, 2017. For the year ended March 31, 2018, the Company incurred total capital expenditures of $186,579, on computers and equipment for its bitcoin mining operations in Lesotho, of which $38,620 was funded from its own cash resources and the remainder was funded by a group of investors to whom the Company issued short-term promissory notes bearing interest at 10% per annum.

Financing activities. Net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended March 31, 2018 was $173,376 compared to $20,000 for the year ended March 31, 2017. This increase was largely due to short term borrowings provided by various related parties in order to fund the increased overhead costs that were incurred in the Company’s transition to the bitcoin mining business.

As disclosed in Note 6, the Company has incurred substantial long-term debt obligations in the acquisition of Power Blockchain in February 2018, as well as for increased overhead and other costs related to the Company’s transition to the bitcoin mining business. The following table sets forth the contractual obligations under our long-term debt agreements as of March 31, 2018 (in thousands):

Payments Due By Period

Total

2019

2020-2021

2022-2023

After 2023

Long-term debt

$

2,200

$

$

1,100

$

1,100

$

Interest on long-term debt

385

385

Total

$

2,585

$

$

1,100

$

1,485

$

We are generating minimal revenue from our crypto-currency mining operations. Accordingly, we will need to raise additional capital to fund our future operations. Until such time that we can generate substantial revenue from operations, if ever, we expect to finance our operating activities through a combination of equity offerings and debt financings and we may seek to raise additional capital through strategic collaborations.

15


However, we may be unable to raise additional funds or enter into such arrangements when needed on favorable terms, or at all, which would have a negative impact on our financial condition and could force us to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our operations. Failure to receive additional funding could cause us to cease operations, in part or in full. Furthermore, even if we believe we have sufficient funds for our current or future operating plans, we may seek additional capital due to favorable market conditions or strategic considerations, which may cause dilution to our existing stockholders.

Off-Balance Sheet Transactions

We do not engage in off-balance sheet transactions.

Going Concern

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has reported net losses from continuing operations in the last two years and has suffered recurring losses totaling $2,627,994 since inception.  These factors, among others, indicate that the Company may be unable to continue as a going concern for a reasonable period of time.  The consolidated financial statements do not contain any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, or GAAP. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, as well as the reported expenses incurred during the reporting periods. Our estimates are based on our historical experience and on various other factors that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

The current accounting polices surrounding the mining of crypto-currency are in a state of evolution and are subject to possible change by accounting standard setters and/or other legal or regulatory bodies in the future.  At the present time, we do not believe that any such accounting policies applicable to our crypto-currency mining activities require any especially difficult, subjective or complex judgments, resulting from the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain.

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISKS

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and are not required to provide information required under this item.

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

The consolidated financial statements required by this item are set forth beginning in Item 15 of this report and are incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

There have been no disagreements with our independent registered public accountants on accounting or financial disclosure matters during our two most recent fiscal years.

16


ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.

Our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act), as of the end of the period covered by this Form 10-K. Based on this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) and our Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”), concluded that as a result of the material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting discussed below, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at ensuring that information required to be disclosed in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission's rules and forms and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding disclosure.

Attestation Report of the Registered Public Accounting Firm

Our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting.

Management's Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Our principal executive officer and our principal accounting and financial officer, are responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f). Management conducted an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of March 31, 2018. In making this assessment, management used the criteria described in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).  Based on our assessment using those criteria, management concluded that our internal controls over financial reporting were not effective at the reasonable assurance level, primarily due to a lack of segregation of duties in financial reporting, as of March 31, 2018, and continue to be ineffective.  To the extent practical in light of its current financial condition, the Company will consider expanding financial reporting resources in the future.

It should be noted that any system of controls, however well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable and not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. In addition, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of certain events. Because of these and other inherent limitations of control systems, there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions, regardless of how remote.

In light of the material weakness described above, we performed additional analysis and other post-closing procedures to ensure our consolidated financial statements were prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Accordingly, we believe that the consolidated financial statements included in this report fairly present, in all material respects, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented.

On February 1, 2018, the Company acquired 100% of the equity interests in Power Blockchain through an exchange agreement in a transaction that resulted in the transition from the Company’s existing business of repairing and selling wheelchairs to a new business of mining crypto-currency, as more fully described in Note 1 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2018.  Except for those changes occasioned by that transition, there has been no change in our internal control over financial reporting during our most recent calendar quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION.

None.

17


PART III

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

The following table sets forth certain information, with respect to our current directors and executive officers as of November 30, 2018.

Directors serve until the next annual meeting of the shareholders; until their successors are elected or appointed and qualified, or until their prior resignation or removal. Officers serve for such terms as determined by our board of directors. Each officer holds office until such officer’s successor is elected or appointed and qualified or until such officer’s earlier resignation or removal. No family relationships exist between any of our present directors and officers.

Name

Age

Position

Brent Willson

53

Director, President and Chief Executive Officer

Steve Bond

43

Director and Chief Financial Officer

The following is a brief account of the business experience during the past five years or more of each of our directors and executive officers.

Brent Willson. Brent Willson has served as a director and as our president, chief executive officer since January 2018. Col Willson recently retired after 30-years of distinguished service with the United States Marine Corps. Col Willson rose to the rank of USMC Colonel where he was responsible for large acquisitions, security, facilities and infrastructure. At the Office of the Secretary of Defense Acquisition, Col Willson was responsible for managing the DoD’s portfolio of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft. Since March 2018, Col Willson has served as a director and as president and chief executive officer of NeoVolta, Inc., an intelligent home energy storage system company, and has accordingly devoted a lesser percentage of his time to the business affairs of the Company since then. Col Willson holds a BS in Business Administration, a Masters of Military Science and a Masters of National Security and Strategic Studies. We believe Col Willson’s background in managing large portfolios and his educational background qualifies him to serve as a director of the company.

Steve Bond. Steve Bond has served as a director and as our chief financial officer since January 2018. Over the last 15 years, Steve Bond has worked with over 100 companies as a consulting executive in finance, strategy and revenue growth. Since March 2018, Mr. Bond has served as a director and as chief financial officer of NeoVolta, Inc., an intelligent home energy storage system company, and has accordingly devoted a lesser percentage of his time to the business affairs of the Company since then. Mr. Bond has been active in the San Diego Rotary Club and serves on the Board of Promises to Kids. Mr. Bond graduated Summa Cum Laude in Finance from San Diego State University in 2000. We believe Mr. Bond’s consulting experience and his educational background qualifies him to serve as a director of the company.

Board Committees

We have not yet established any committees of our Board of Directors. Our Board of Directors may designate from among its members an executive committee and one or more other committees in the future. We do not have a nominating committee or a nominating committee charter. The entire Board of Directors performs all functions that would otherwise be performed by committees. If we are able to grow our business and increase our operations, we intend to expand the size of our Board and allocate responsibilities accordingly.

Audit Committee Financial Expert

We have no separate audit committee at this time. The entire Board of Directors oversees our audits and auditing procedures. Given the present size of our Board, we do not believe that it is practical for us to have committees.

18


Shareholder Communications

We do not have a policy with regard to the consideration of any director candidates recommended by security holders. To date, no security holders have made any such recommendations.

Code of Ethics

We have not adopted a code of ethics that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller or persons performing similar functions. We intend to adopt a code of ethics in the near future.

Compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), requires our executive officers and directors, and persons who beneficially own more than ten percent of our common stock, to file initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership with the SEC. Executive officers, directors and greater than ten percent beneficial owners are required by SEC regulations to furnish us with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file. Based upon a review of the copies of such forms furnished to us and written representations from our executive officers and directors, we believe that all reports were filed for the fiscal year, except for a Form 3 and Form 4, which reported one transaction, for each of Col Willson and Mr. Bond, which forms were filed on February 21, 2018.

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

Effective January 25, 2018, our board of directors appointed Brent Willson and Steve Bond as members of the board of directors, and on such date, Anton Yeranossian resigned from the board of directors and as CEO of the Company. On January 29, 2018, we appointed Col Willson to serve as our Chief Executive Officer and President, and Steve Bond to serve as our Chief Financial Officer.

Our named executive officers for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018, which consist of all individuals that served as our principal executive officer during the fiscal year and our other most highly compensated executive officer, are: (i) Brent Willson, our director, president and chief executive officer; (ii) Steve Bond, our director and chief financial officer; and (ii) Anton Yeranossian, our former chief executive officer.

Summary Compensation Table

Name and Principal Position

year

Salary($)

Stock award ($)(1)

Total ($)

Brent Willson, President and Chief Executive Officer(2)

2018

$22,178

$5,375

$27,553

Steve Bond, Chief Financial Officer

2018

$12,087

$1,792

$13,879

Anton Yeranossian, Former Chief Executive Officer(4)

2018

2017

(1)

Represents the amortized portion of the grant date fair value of the stock awards granted calculated in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718. These amounts are determined in accordance with the provisions of FASB ASC Topic 718, rather than an amount paid to or realized by the executive officer.  For a description of these stock awards, see Note 5 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

(2)

Col Willson joined the Company on January 25, 2018.   The amount shown in the first column represents the payments made by the Company to Col Willson from the start date of his engagement through March 31, 2018.  Such payments were made to Col Willson in his capacity as a contractor, not as an employee, and include $12,512 paid to his personal consulting company.

19


(3)

Mr. Bond joined the Company in January 25, 2018.  The amount shown in the first column represents the payments made by the Company to Mr. Bond from the start date of his engagement through March 31, 2018.  Such payments were made to Mr. Bond in his capacity as a contractor, not as an employee.

(4)

For the years ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, Mr. Yeranossian was the Company’s sole executive officer and director. The Company did not pay Mr. Yeranossian any compensation for his services as an executive officer or director of the Company.

Equity Awards

The Company: (i) did not grant any stock options to its executive officers or directors from inception through fiscal year end March 31, 2018 and March 31, 2017; (ii) did not have any outstanding equity awards as of March 31, 2018; and (iii) had no options exercised by its named executive officer in fiscal years ending March 31, 2018 and March 31, 2017.

Employment and Consulting Agreements

On January 29, 2018, the Company entered into an at-will employment agreement, which was subsequently amended, with Colonel Brent Willson pursuant to which Col. Willson agreed to serve as Chief Executive Officer and President of the Company commencing on such date.  Contemporaneous with Col. Willson’s execution of the agreement, Col. Willson purchased from the Company 750,000 shares of Company common stock at a purchase price of $0.001 per share. This stock grant was structured so that it is fully vested over a three year period and is subject to buyback by the Company if Col. Willson should leave the Company before then.  Further, the Company entered into a subsequent consulting agreement with Canmore International Inc., an entity controlled by Col. Willson, to provide it with consulting, marketing, design and public relations work, pursuant to which it has agreed to pay Canmore International Inc. fees generally equal to 66-2/3% of the amount to which Col. Willson would otherwise be entitled to receive for his services. The consulting agreement is terminable by either party at any time upon 30 days’ notice.

On January 29, 2018, the Company entered into an at-will employment agreement with Mr. Steve Bond pursuant to which Mr. Bond agreed to serve as Chief Financial Officer of the Company commencing on such date. Contemporaneous with Mr. Bond’s execution of the agreement, Mr. Bond purchased from the Company 250,000 shares of Company common stock at a purchase price of $0.001 per share. This stock grant was structured so that it is fully vested over a three year period and is subject to buyback by the Company if Mr. Bond should leave the Company before then.

Compensation of Directors

Our directors do not receive any compensation for serving as such.  As of the date hereof, there were no other arrangements between us and our directors that resulted in our making payments to any of our directors for any services provided to us by them as directors.

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

The following tables set forth certain information regarding the beneficial ownership of our common stock as of November 30, 2018 of (i) each person known to us to beneficially own more than 5% of our common stock, (ii) our directors, (iii) each named executive officer, and (iv) all directors and named executive officers as a group. As of November 30, 2018, there were a total of 1,204,000 shares of common stock outstanding. Each share of common stock is entitled to one vote on matters on which holders of voting stock of the Company are eligible to vote. The column entitled “Percent” shows the percentage of voting common stock beneficially owned by each listed party.

20


The number of shares beneficially owned is determined under the rules promulgated by the SEC, and the information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under those rules, beneficial ownership includes any shares as to which a person or entity has sole or shared voting power or investment power plus any shares which such person or entity has the right to acquire within sixty (60) days of November 30, 2018, through the exercise or conversion of any stock option, convertible security, warrant or other right. Unless otherwise indicated, each person or entity named in the table has sole voting power and investment power (or shares such power with that person’s spouse) with respect to all shares of capital stock listed as owned by that person or entity.

Beneficial Ownership

Directors and Executive Officers

Amount

Percent

Brent Willson (1)

750,000

62.3

Steve Bond (1)

250,000

20.8

Anton Yeranossian (2)

Directors and Executive Officers as a Group (3)

1,000,000

83.1

(1)

The shares in the table are subject to the Company’s right to buyback the shares as described in Item 11. Executive Compensation under the section “Employment and Consulting Agreements.”

(2)

Mr. Yeranossian resigned as a director and officer on January 25, 2018.

(3)

Includes the shares held by Col Wilson and Mr. Bond.

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

Prior Office Space

Until January 25, 2018, the Company’s former director, Anton Yeranossian, contributed office space for the Company’s use at no charge to the Company. The office space contributed was at the same location as A&A Medical Supply, a medical supply company managed by Anton Yeranossian.

Prior Service Agreement

The Company was party to a Service Agreement with A&A Medical Supply, LLC until the agreement was terminated on January 25, 2018.  The Company’s former officer and director, Mr. Yeranossian, is CEO of A&A Medical Supply and A&A Medical Supply is owned by the parents of Mr. Yeranossian.  The material terms of the Service Agreement between the Company and A&A Medical Supply were as follows: (i) the agreement gave the Company the right of first refusal to rebuild any wheelchairs returned to A&A Medical Supply, LLC; (ii) A&A agreed to provide the Company with wheelchairs in need of repair and provide the Company the specifications to rebuild the wheelchair for A&A’s client; (iii) the Company agreed to provide overall quality control, logistics in ordering the replacement components, the management and administrative duties with respect to rebuilding wheelchairs; and (iv) the wheelchairs must meet the specifications to qualify for Medicare/insurance reimbursement. When the wheelchairs were rebuilt to the satisfaction of A&A, the Company was permitted to bill A&A for parts and labor.

Director Independence

We are not currently subject to listing requirements of any national securities exchange or inter-dealer quotation system which has requirements that a majority of the Board of Directors be “independent” and, as a result, we are not at this time required to (and we do not) have our Board of Directors comprised of a majority of “Independent Directors.”

21


Our Board of Directors has considered the independence of its Directors in reference to the definition of “Independent Director” established by the Nasdaq Marketplace Rule 5605(a)(2). In doing so, the Board of Directors has reviewed all commercial and other relationships of each director in making its determination as to the independence of its Directors. After such review, the Board of Directors has determined none of our directors qualifies as independent under the requirements of the Nasdaq listing standards.

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

Aggregate fees for professional services rendered by AMC Auditing for their services for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, were as follows:

2018

2017

Audit and Quarterly Review Fees

$

12,000

$

9,773

Audit-related fees

Tax fees

All other fees

TOTAL

$

12,000

$

9,773

Audit and Quarterly Review Fees

Audit fees represent the aggregate fees billed for professional services rendered by our independent accounting firm for the audit of our annual financial statements, review of financial statements included in our quarterly reports, review of registration statements or services that are normally provided in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements for those fiscal years.

Audit-Related Fees

Audit-related fees represent the aggregate fees billed for assurance and related services that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported under Audit Fees.

Tax Fees

Tax fees represent the aggregate fees billed for professional services rendered by our principal accountants for tax compliance, tax advice, and tax planning for such years.

All Other Fees

All other fees represent the aggregate fees billed for products and services other than the services reported in the other categories.

Audit Committee Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

We do not have an audit committee. Our Board of Directors performs the function of an audit committee. Section 10A(i) of the Exchange Act prohibits our auditors from performing audit services for us as well as any services not considered to be audit services unless such services are pre-approved by our audit committee or, in cases where no such committee exists, by our Board of Directors (in lieu of an audit committee) or unless the services meet certain de minimis standards.

22


PART IV

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(a)

Documents filed as part of this Report

1.

Financial Statements

The consolidated financial statements and notes thereto which are attached hereto beginning on page F-1 have been included by reference into Item 8 of this part of the annual report on Form 10-K. See the Index to Consolidated Financial Statements on page F-1.

2.

Financial Statement Schedules

All schedules are omitted because they are inapplicable or not required or the required information is shown in the consolidated financial statements or notes thereto.

3.

Exhibits

The information required by this Item is set forth in the Exhibit Index that follows the signature page of this Annual Report.

EXHIBIT INDEX

Exhibit

Number

Description

3.1

Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to exhibit 3.1 of the Form S-1 filed May 23, 2013)

3.2

Bylaws (incorporated by reference to exhibit 3.2 of the Form S-1 filed May 23, 2013)

4.1

Form of five-year Note issued in Exchange Agreement between Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc., PBC Group, LLC and Black Car, Inc. dated February 1, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.4 of the Form 8-K) filed February 2, 2018)

10.1 **

Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. 2018 Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Annex B to the Definitive Information Statement filed March 5, 2018)

10.2 **

Employment Agreement between Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. and Brent Willson dated January 29, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.1 of the Form 8-K filed February 2, 2018)

10.3 **

Employment Agreement between Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. and Steve Bond dated January 29, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.2 of the Form 8-K filed February 2, 2018)

10.4

Exchange Agreement between Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc., PBC Group, LLC and Black Car, Inc. dated February 1, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.3 of the Form 8-K filed February 2, 2018)

10.5

Form of promissory notes due July 31, 2018 issued effective January 25, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.5 of the Form 8-K filed February 2, 2018)

10.6 **

Consulting Agreement between Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. and Canmore International, Inc. dated February 15, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.1 of the Form 8-K filed March 9, 2018)

23


Exhibit

Number

Description

10.7 **

Amendment to the Employment Agreement between Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. and Brent Willson dated February 15, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.2 of the Form 8-K filed March 9, 2018)

10.8

Settlement and Mutual Release Agreement, dated March 22, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.1 of the Form 8-K filed March 30, 2018)

10.9

Stipulation and Proposed Order Thereon, dated March 22, 2018 (incorporated by reference to exhibit 10.2 of the Form 8-K filed March 30, 2018)

21

Subsidiaries of the Registrant

Power Blockchain, LLC (Wyoming)

31.1*

Certification of Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of Sarbanes- Oxley Act of 2002

31.2*

Certification of Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

32.1*

Certification of Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to Section  906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

32.2*

Certification of Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

101.INS *

XBRL Instance Document

101.SCH *

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

101.CAL *

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

101.PRE *

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

101.DEF *

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

101.LAB *

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document

*

Filed herewith.

**

Denotes a management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

24


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

HOLLY BROTHERS PICTURES, INC.

Date: December 6, 2018

By:

/s/ Brent Willson

Brent Willson,

Chief Executive Officer, President and Director

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

Signature

Title

Date

/s/ Brent Willson

Chief Executive Officer, President, and Director

6 December 2018

Brent Willson

(Principal Executive Officer)

/s/ Steve Bond

Chief Financial Officer and Director

6 December 2018

Steve Bond

(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

25


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Financial Statements

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

F-1


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. (the “Company”) as of March 31, 2018 and March 31, 2017 and the related statements of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended March 31, 2018, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of March 31, 2018 and March 31, 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended March 31, 2018 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

Basis for Opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management.  Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern.  As discussed in Note 3 to the financial statements, the Company has no revenues, has negative working capital at March 31, 2018, has incurred recurring losses and recurring negative cash flow from operating activities, and has an accumulated deficit which raises substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern.  Management’s plans concerning these matters are also described in Note 3.  The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

/s/ AMC Auditing

AMC Auditing

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2016

Las Vegas, Nevada

November 30, 2018

F-2


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

March 31, 2018

March 31, 2017

ASSETS

Current assets:

Cash and cash equivalents

$

12,297

$

7,395

Prepaid insurance

10,184

Total current assets

22,481

7,395

Property and equipment:

Computers, equipment and software

186,579

Accumulated depreciation and impairment

(186,579)

Net property and equipment

Other indefinite-lived intangible assets:

Internally-generated Bitcoin

3,761

Total other assets

3,761

TOTAL ASSETS

$

26,242

$

7,395

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

Current liabilities:

Accounts payable – other

$11,550

$

300

Accounts payable – related party

3,400

Notes payable – related parties

645,335

30,000

Accrued interest payable

28,609

Total current liabilities

688,894

30,300

Other liabilities:

Non-current convertible notes payable – related parties

2,200,000

Total liabilities

2,888,894

30,300

Stockholders' equity:

Common stock, $0.001 par value, 200,000,000 shares authorized,

1,204,000 and 2,710,000 shares issued and outstanding as of

3/31/2018 and 3/31/2017, respectively

1,204

2,710

Additional paid-in capital

101,477

49,465

Accumulated deficit

(2,627,994)

(75,080)

Treasury stock

(337,339)

Total stockholders’ equity

(2,862,652)

(22,905)

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

$

26,242

$

7,395

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

F-3


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

For the year ended

March 31, 2018

For the year ended

March 31, 2017

Revenue

$

$

Operating expenses:

General & administrative

135,682

21,616

Depreciation expense

16,393

Total operating expenses

152,075

21,616

Other income (expense):

Impairment expense:

Goodwill

(2,200,000)

Property and equipment

(170,186)

Other intangible assets

(2,044)

Interest expense

(28,609)

Total other income (expense)

(2,400,839)

Net (Loss)

$

(2,552,914)

$

(21,616)

Weighted average number of common

shares outstanding- basic

2,466,090

2,710,000

Net loss per share

$

(1.04)

$

(0.01)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

F-4


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Equity

Common Stock

Additional

Paid-In

Capital

Accumulated

Deficit

Treasury

Stock

Stockholders'

Equity

Shares

Amount

Balance, March 31, 2016

2,710,000

$

2,710

$

49,465

$

(53,464)

$

$

(1,289)

Net (loss)

(21,616)

(21,616)

Balance, March 31, 2017

2,710,000

2,710

49,465

(75,080)

(22,905)

Stock issued to settle

note da pagare

155,172

155

44,845

45,000

Purchase of treasury stock

(2,661,172)

(2,661)

(337,339)

(340,000)

Issuance of shares to officers

1,000,000

1,000

7,167

8,167

Net (loss)

(2,552,914)

(2,552,914)

Balance, March 31, 2018

1,204,000

$

1,204

$

101,477

$

(2,627,994)

$

(337,339)

$

(2,862,652)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

F-5


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

For the year ended

March 31, 2018

For the year ended

March 31, 2017

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Net loss

$

(2,552,914)

$

(21,616)

Adjustment to reconcile net loss to net cash

used by operating activities:

Impairment expense:

Goodwill

2,200,000

Property and equipment

170,186

Depreciation expense

16,393

Stock compensation expense

7,167

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

Accrued interest payable

28,609

Accounts payable – other

11,250

(977)

Accounts payable – related party

3,400

Prepaid expense

(10,184)

750

Internally-generated Bitcoin

(3,761)

Net cash (used) by operating activities

(129,854)

(21,843)

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Purchase of computers and equipment

(38,620)

Net cash (used) in investing activities

(38,620)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Issuance of notes payable to related parties

172,376

20,000

Issuance of common stock to officers

1,000

Net cash provided by financing activities

173,376

20,000

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH

4,902

(1,843)

CASH – BEGINNING OF THE PERIOD

7,395

9,238

CASH – END OF THE PERIOD

$

12,297

$

7,395

Supplemental Disclosures:

Interest paid

$

$

Income taxes paid

Non-Cash Investing and Financing Activities:

Stock issued to settle Notes Payable

$

45,000

$

Issuance of Notes Payable for Goodwill

2,200,000

Issuance of Notes Payable for Treasury Stock

340,000

Issuance of Notes Payable for computers and equipment

147,959

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

F-6


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

March 31, 2018 and 2017

(Audited)

NOTE 1. GENERAL ORGANIZATION AND BUSINESS

Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. is a Nevada Corporation incorporated in the State of Nevada on February 22, 2013 as PowerMedChairs, and is considered to be an emerging growth company under applicable federal securities laws. On June 2, 2017, the Company changed its name to Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.  On February 1, 2018, the Company acquired 100% of the equity interests in Power Blockchain, LLC (“Power Blockchain”) through an exchange agreement in a transaction that resulted in the transition from the Company’s existing business of repairing and selling wheelchairs to a planned new business of mining crypto-currency (see Note 4).

NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of Accounting

The basis is United States generally accepted accounting principles.  The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Power Blockchain, since February 1, 2018.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all short-term investments with a maturity of three months or less at the date of purchase to be cash and cash equivalents.

Earnings per Share

The basic earnings (loss) per share is calculated by dividing the Company’s net income (loss) available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares issued and outstanding during the year. The diluted earnings (loss) per share is calculated by dividing the Company’s net income (loss) available to common shareholders by the diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding during the year. The diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding is the basic weighted number of shares adjusted as of the first year for any potentially dilutive debt or equity.

The Company has not issued any options or warrants or similar securities since inception.

Fair value of financial instruments

Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of March 2018 and 2017. The respective carrying value of certain on-balance-sheet financial instruments approximated their fair values. These financial instruments include cash and accounts payable. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for cash and payables because they are short term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair values or they are payable on demand.

Level 1: The preferred inputs to valuation efforts are “quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities,” with the caveat that the reporting entity must have access to that market. Information at this level is based on direct observations of transactions involving the same assets and liabilities, not assumptions, and thus offers superior reliability. However, relatively few items, especially physical assets, actually trade in active markets.

Level 2: FASB acknowledged that active markets for identical assets and liabilities are relatively uncommon and, even when they do exist, they may be too thin to provide reliable information. To deal with this shortage of direct data, the board provided a second level of inputs that can be applied in three situations.

F-7


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

March 31, 2018 and 2017

(Audited)

NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

Fair value of financial instruments (Continued)

Level 3: If inputs from levels 1 and 2 are not available, FASB acknowledges that fair value measures of many assets and liabilities are less precise. The board describes Level 3 inputs as “unobservable,” and limits their use by saying they “shall be used to measure fair value to the extent that observable inputs are not available.” This category allows “for situations in which there is little, if any, market activity for the asset or liability at the measurement date”. Earlier in the standard, FASB explains that “observable inputs” are gathered from sources other than the reporting company and that they are expected to reflect assumptions made by market participants.

Revenue recognition

We recognize revenue when all of the following conditions are satisfied: (1) there is a persuasive evidence of an arrangement; (2) the product or service has been provided to the customer; (3) the amount of fees to be paid by the customer is fixed or determinable; and (4) the collection of our fees is probable.

The Company will record revenue when it is realizable and earned and the services have been rendered to the customers.  Based on such criteria, the Company has not recorded any revenues from Inception on February 22, 2013 through March 31, 2018.

Goodwill

We periodically evaluate goodwill arising from business combinations by applying a goodwill impairment test, both qualitatively and, quantitatively, if necessary, in accordance with the provisions of ASC 350, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (see Note 4).

Property and Equipment

Computers, equipment and software are generally depreciated on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives ranging up to three years (see Note 4).

Bitcoin

Internally-generated Bitcoin is recorded at the lower of cost or market value based on industry standard quoted prices for Bitcoin.

Dividends

The Company has not yet adopted any policy regarding payment of dividends. No dividends have been paid during the period shown.

Income Taxes

The provision for income taxes is the total of the current taxes payable and the net of the change in the deferred income taxes. Provision is made for the deferred income taxes where differences exist between the period in which transactions affect current taxable income and the period in which they enter into the determination of net income in the financial statements.

Year-end

The Company has selected March 31 as its fiscal year-end.

Advertising

Advertising is expensed when incurred. There has been no advertising during the periods.

F-8


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

March 31, 2018 and 2017

(Audited)

NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

Use of Estimates

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

NOTE 3. GOING CONCERN

The Company's consolidated financial statements are prepared using the generally accepted accounting principles applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. However, the Company has not commenced its planned principal operations and it has not generated any revenues and has suffered recurring losses totaling $2,627,994 since inception. In order to obtain the necessary capital, the Company is seeking equity and/or debt financing. There are no assurances that the Company will be successful, without sufficient financing it would be unlikely for the Company to continue as a going concern. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or amounts and classification of liabilities that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

NOTE 4. ACQUISITION OF POWER BLOCKCHAIN

Effective February 1, 2018, the Company acquired 100% of the equity interests in Power Blockchain through an exchange agreement between the Company and the two owners of Power Blockchain. Pursuant to the exchange agreement, the sole consideration in this transaction was the issuance by the Company of unsecured notes payable to the two owners of Power Blockchain in the amount of $2,200,000. Such notes payable were structured to: (i) mature five years from the date of issuance, (ii) accrue interest at the rate of 5% per annum, (iii) require repayment in four equal installments beginning on the second anniversary of issuance, and (iv) are convertible into the Company’s common stock at a conversion price of $0.13 per share.

We have accounted for the acquisition of Power Blockchain as a business combination, with the Company treated as the acquirer, in accordance with the provisions of ASC 805, Business Combinations.  At the time of the transaction, Power Blockchain was a start-up venture with little or no identifiable assets or operations, therefore, we allocated the entire merger consideration in the amount of $2,200,000 to the category of Goodwill for accounting purposes.  No pro forma financial information has been presented since Power Blockchain was a start-up venture.

Due to unforeseen economic and market conditions that arose soon after the acquisition, we believe that the results of the Company’s initial bitcoin mining operations through the Power Blockchain entity should be considered inconclusive to date, with no revenues yet recorded.  As a result of these conditions, we have determined that it would be appropriate to recognize an impairment adjustment in the full amount of $2,200,000, in order to reduce the carrying value of the Goodwill to zero as of March 31, 2018.  Additionally, we recognized an impairment adjustment in the amount of $170,186 to reduce the carrying value of the property and equipment deployed in the bitcoin mining operations to zero as of March 31, 2018.

F-9


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

March 31, 2018 and 2017

(Audited)

NOTE 5. STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY AND CONTRIBUTED CAPITAL

On January 25, 2018, in conjunction with the acquisition of Power Blockchain, the Company purchased a total of 2,661,172 shares of its common stock from the former management group for a negotiated payment in the amount of $340,000, or $0.13 per share, which has been accounted for as Treasury Stock.

On January 29, 2018, also in conjunction with the acquisition of Power Blockchain, the Company issued a total of 1,000,000 shares of common stock, at a purchase price of $0.001 per share, to two new officers who were engaged to affect the transition to the business of bitcoin mining. These stock grants were structured so that they are fully vested over a three year period and are subject to buyback by the Company if either officer should leave the Company before then. We have valued the stock grants at an incremental amount of $129,000, based on the negotiated price of the simultaneously purchased treasury stock noted above, and are amortizing that amount as stock compensation expense over a period of three years (of that amount, $7,167 was amortized in the last two months of the year ended March 31, 2018).

Taking the above transactions into consideration, as well as the conversion of a $45,000 note payable into 155,172 shares of common stock in December 2017, the Company had a total of 1,204,000 shares of common stock issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2018.

There have been no issuances of stock options or warrants. However, in March 2018, the Board approved the establishment of a new 2018 Stock Option Plan with an authorization for the issuance of up to 1,000,000 shares of common stock. The Plan is designed to provide for future discretionary grants of stock options, stock awards and stock unit awards to key employees and non-employee directors.

NOTE 6. NOTES PAYABLE

As of March 31, 2018, the Company had the following long-term debt obligations:

Promissory notes issued to former owners in acquisition of Power Blockchain,

accruing interest at 5% per annum, principal repayments due in four equal

installments on 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th anniversaries, convertible into common

stock at $0.13 per share.

$

2,200,000

Other short term notes issued to various affiliates of the former owners of Power

Blockchain for  acquisition of Treasury Stock, computers and equipment, and

working capital financing, at stated interest rates of 10%.

645,335

2,845,335

Current portion of long term debt

(645,335)

Long term debt, net of current portion

$

2,200,000

Future maturities of long-term debt as of March 31, 2018 are as follows:

F-10


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

March 31, 2018 and 2017

(Audited)

NOTE 6. NOTES PAYABLE (CONTINUED)

Year ending March 31, 2019

$

Year ending March 31, 2020

550,000

Year ending March 31, 2021

550,000

Year ending March 31, 2022

550,000

Year ending March 31, 2023

550,000

$

2,200,000

At the time of the Power Blockchain acquisition, Power Blockchain had outstanding unsecured notes payable to the two owners in the amount of $570,000, which were overdue and in default. Shortly thereafter, the Company entered into negotiations with the note holders in an attempt to settle these obligations. As a result of those efforts, a settlement agreement was reached in March 2018 to convert the notes payable into the right for the two note holders to receive periodic issuances of the Company’s common stock of up to approximately 3,000,000 shares each, that would be exempted from registration pursuant to Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act of 1933.  The settlement agreement stipulated that the issuance of such shares shall occur in respective tranches such that the resulting number of shares owned by each holder would not exceed 4.9% of the Company’s then outstanding shares of common stock. To date, no such shares have been issued. Post-settlement, the Company has no further obligation to repay the notes, therefore, no accounting recognition was given to them in the purchase price allocation for the acquisition. No value has been given to the note holders’ rights to receive shares due to the wide range of possible variables that would need to be quantified in order to make such a valuation and the resulting inherent imprecision.

NOTE 7. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

In the year ended March 31, 2018, the Company entered into several transactions with various related parties to: (i) purchase shares of Treasury Stock from the former management team, (ii) issue new shares of common stock to officers, and (iii) convert notes payable into shares of common stock, as more fully described in Note 5.

The Company does not lease or rent any property.  Office services are provided without charge by a director. Such costs are immaterial to the consolidated financial statements and, accordingly, have not been reflected therein. The officers and directors of the Company are involved in other business activities and may, in the future, become involved in other business opportunities. If a specific business opportunity becomes available, such persons may face a conflict in selecting between the Company and their other business interests. The Company has not formulated a policy for the resolution of such conflicts.

NOTE 8. PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES

The Company accounts for income taxes under FASB Accounting Standard Codification ASC 740 "Income Taxes". ASC 740 requires use of the liability method. ASC 740 provides that deferred tax assets and liabilities are recorded based on the differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts for financial reporting purposes, referred to as temporary differences. Deferred tax assets and liabilities at the end of each period are determined using the currently enacted tax rates applied to taxable income in the periods in which the deferred tax assets and liabilities are expected to be settled or realized.

As of March 31, 2018, the Company had net operating loss carry forwards of approximately $345,747, after taking certain non-deductible items into account, as compared to $21,616 at March 31, 2017, that may be available to reduce future years' taxable income. Future tax benefits which may arise as a result of these losses have not been recognized in these financial statements, as their realization is determined not likely to occur and accordingly, the Company has recorded a valuation allowance for the deferred tax asset relating to these tax loss carry-forwards. Net operating losses will begin to expire in 2038.

F-11


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

March 31, 2018 and 2017

(Audited)

NOTE 8. PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED)

Components of net deferred tax assets, including a valuation allowance, are as follows at March 31, 2018 and March 31, 2017:

2018

2017

Deferred tax assets:

Net operating loss carry forward

$

72,600

$

7,566

Total deferred tax assets

72,600

7,566

Less: valuation allowance

(72,600)

(7,566)

Net deferred tax assets

$

$

The valuation allowance for deferred tax assets for the year ending March 31, 2018 was $(72,600), as compared to $(7,566) for the same period last year. In assessing the recovery of the deferred tax assets, management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income in the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible. Management considers the scheduled reversals of future deferred tax assets, projected future taxable income, and tax planning strategies in making this assessment. As a result, management determined it was more likely than not the deferred tax assets would not be realized as of March 31, 2018. The provision for income taxes differs from the amount computed by applying the statutory federal income tax rate to income before provision for income taxes. The sources and tax effects of the differences are as follows:

U.S federal statutory rate

(21.0%)

Valuation reserve

21.0%

Total

–%

At March 31, 2018, we had an unused net operating loss carryover approximating $420,800, after taking certain non-deductible items into account, that is available to offset future taxable income which expires beginning 2038.

NOTE 9. OPERATING LEASES AND OTHER COMMITMENTS

The Company has no lease or other obligations.

NOTE 10. RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

The Company's management has evaluated all the recently issued accounting pronouncements through the filing date of these consolidated financial statements and does not believe that any of these pronouncements will have a material impact on the Company's financial position and results of operations.

F-12


Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

March 31, 2018 and 2017

(Audited)

NOTE 11. LITIGATION

From time to time in the ordinary course of our business, we may be involved in legal proceedings, the outcomes of which may not be determinable. The results of litigation are inherently unpredictable. Any claims against us, whether meritorious or not, could be time consuming, result in costly litigation, require significant amounts of management time and result in diversion of significant resources. We are not able to estimate an aggregate amount or range of reasonably possible losses for those legal matters for which losses are not probable and estimable, primarily for the following reasons: (i) many of the relevant legal proceedings are in preliminary stages, and until such proceedings develop further, there is often uncertainty regarding the relevant facts and circumstances at issue and potential liability; and (ii) many of these proceedings involve matters of which the outcomes are inherently difficult to predict. We have insurance policies covering potential losses where such coverage is cost effective.

We are not at this time involved in any legal proceedings.

NOTE 12. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

During the months of April, May and June 2018, the Company made additional short-term borrowings from a related party in the total amount of $72,000 on the same terms as the borrowings made in the year ended March 31, 2018.  There have been no other reportable subsequent events that have occurred since March 31, 2018.

F-13

Exhibit 31.1

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

15 U.S.C. SECTION 7241 AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 302 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

I, Brent Willson, certify that:

1.

I have reviewed this annual report on Form 10-K of Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. (the “registrant”);

2.

Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

3.

Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4.

The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in the Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) for the registrant and have:

a)

Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

b)

Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

c)

Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; is

d)

Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant's fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal controls over financial reporting.

5.

The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent function):

a)

All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; is

b)

Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

Date:  December 6, 2018

/s/ Brent Willson

Brent Willson

Chief Executive Officer

Exhibit 31.2

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

15 U.S.C. SECTION 7241 AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 302 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

I, Steve Bond, certify that:

1.

I have reviewed this annual report on Form 10-K of Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. (the “registrant”);

2.

Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

3.

Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4.

The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in the Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) for the registrant and have:

a)

Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

b)

Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

c)

Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; is

d)

Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant's fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal controls over financial reporting.

5.

The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent function):

a)

All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; is

b)

Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

Date:  December 6, 2018

/s/ Steve Bond

Steve Bond

Chief Financial Officer

Exhibit 32.1

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350 AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

In connection with the Annual Report of Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. (the “registrant”) on Form 10-K for the year ended March 31, 2018, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I, Brent Willson, Chief Executive Officer of the registrant, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of this Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002, that, to my knowledge:

(1)

The Report fully complies with the requirements of section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934; is

(2)

The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the registrant.

/s/Brent Willson

Brent Willson

Chief Executive Officer

6 December 2018

Exhibit 32.2

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350 AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

In connection with the Annual Report of Holly Brothers Pictures, Inc. (the “registrant”) on Form 10-K for the year ended March 31, 2018, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I, Steve Bond, Chief Financial Officer of the registrant, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of this Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002, that, to my knowledge:

(1)

The Report fully complies with the requirements of section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934; is

(2)

The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the registrant.

/s/Steve Bond

Steve Bond

Chief Financial Officer

6 December 2018

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